Inside the Hall: Maryland Hall News Blog

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MHCA President Linnell Bowen (3rd from left) and members of the Severn Town Club (above) present a check for $35,000 to Maryland Hall.  The check represents the proceeds from the Club's 53rd annual Holly Ball which took place in November 2016.  The funds will support Maryland Hall's educational and artistic programs.  Thank you to the Severn Town Club and the more than 225 people who attended the ball for their support of Maryland Hall! 

Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts’ (MHCA) President and CEO Linnell Bowen has announced her retirement from MHCA effective June 30, 2017.    

Bowen will transition to a role with MHCA’s Capital Campaign--called The Campaign for Maryland Hall--a multi-year campaign to raise $18 million to modernize and expand Maryland Hall.

Maryland Hall’s Board has hired executive search firm Raffa (based in Washington, DC and Rockville) to assist in managing the transition and search process for a new President.  The search will be announced by the firm in mid to late February.  

Says Bowen of her many years at Maryland Hall and in the building:  “I loved Annapolis High School (my high school) and I loved teaching here in the 60’s. And I loved my past 21 years at the helm of Maryland Hall. Arts and education is my passion and we have accomplished great things together. The mission of Maryland Hall is so important and we look to the next CEO to continue the successes we’ve had. I thank all of our patrons for your past and on-going support of our mission and for all you’ve done to help make our organization the successful organization it is today!” 

“We have accomplished a lot in the past two decades,” she adds, “including restored theatre windows, new doors, turning a high school auditorium into an intimate concert hall, and last week, the groundbreaking for the first new construction on site since the building’s construction in 1932.  I am proud of all that we offer to the community through education, exhibits, and performances. We truly deliver Art for All!  I am happy to stay involved in the Capital Campaign but am ready to turn over the leadership of the organization to my successor and support whoever the Board selects for that position.” 

 

Read the article from the Capital Gazette: Maryland Hall president to retire after 21 years

Linnell Bowen sits in her office among some of her favorite pieces of local art and awards she has earned as president of Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.

Her eyes moving around the room, she settles on one award in particular: The Arts Council of Anne Arundel County Annie Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Bowen received the reward in 2011, 15 years after starting her tenure as Maryland Hall president in 1996. Lifetime achievement awards are often given to people who have completed their work, but Bowen continued on in her position.

Now that will be coming to an end.

(Follow this link to continue reading)

Purchase a Young Patron membership during the month of February and receive an  additional young patron membership free to share with a friend. Learn more about Young Patron memberships and join today.


 

Young Patron Happy Hour

 

Maryland Hall is hosting a free happy hour in the galleries on Thursday, February 23rd from 5-7 pm. This is an opportunity to view artwork, learn more about the Young Patrons, and enjoy wine from Great Frogs Winery. 

RSVP to the FREE Happy Hour Here. Those who RSVP in advance will be entered to win admission for 1 to the Sip and Paint with Kim Hovell on Thursday, March 2nd at Maryland Hall. 

 


 

Sip and Paint with Kim Hovell

 

Explore your artistic side with our popular Sip and Paint workshop on Thursday, March 2. Create your own original artwork under the guidance of local artist Kim Hovell. Bring your own wine and snacks to enjoy during the workshop.​ Register here.

We are saddened to learn of the passing of Phyllis Avedon at the age of 90.  Phyllis was a long-time MD Hall Artist-in-Residence, a founding member and coordinator of our Drawing and Painting Co-ops and organizer of many trips to arts destinations around the region.  She was a vital part of our community for many years and will be missed.   To read more about Phyllis Avedon and her accomplished life please follow this link.

 

Interview with Elizabeth Kendall

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I just finished a ceiling sculpture for the MGM complex. I moved here over a year ago and didn’t have a studio. I was between projects. Then, a neighbor introduced me to someone who asked for Maryland artists for the MGM project. I got the residency here and everything has snowballed and developed since then.

If I didn’t have a studio here the MGM installation couldn’t have happened. It was great because it was something that will open up a bunch of new ideas and projects. Glass and light are new for me. I just finished a piece through an art consulting firm in Atlanta. Now that those things are over I am focused on ideas for my show at Maryland Hall next November. My framework for that is observations and experiences between my home and the studio.

What are the primary materials that you use?

Clay. I am using more glass and I have used fabric in the past. What I love about any material is that it requires you to use specific tools. you can exchange tools for different things - a belt sander to sand clay, rolling pin from the kitchen. I look at clay like fabric and I am referencing fabric and things from the sewing room.

My grandmother did knitting ,weaving, sewing, basket weaving, etc. so my memories are all of the things from her sewing room. She made clothes for my dolls and such. I don’t like the process as much as I like it in pottery.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

It is a frustrating memory because I had this idea of what good art was. I came to art through craft, through process. I had to get technique into my hands before I could get emotion into the work. I started off at a community center taking a ceramics class. I had a five year plan to become a potter and it evolved from there.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

I feel that all the time when I see things or you look at something and it resonated with you. But almost inevitably when I am done a project then the next the piece is the one I wish I had made. You solve a problem or you work through a process . or you learn something right at the end that you want to put into the next work.

How do you know when a work is finished?

There are stages of doneness. throwing, trimming, rolling it out, drying it out.. all different stage. I don’t always know until the deadline is done or until afterwards. And, often times I think that is what keeps me coming back. Especially with ceramics where you rely on the kiln to help you finish it, things come out unexpected. That’s OK. then you can look at it and say oh that's cool how that came out. I love the serendipity. I also love the control you can get.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?

It has been great to meet other makers and people who are just involved with this community. I moved and it’s far enough that I need to make a new set of paths. I have always enjoyed having my door open. that’s the challenge of working at home is that you're alone. Every place has it systems. you take what you need and don’t take what you don’t need.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

Typically I would say process, and that is what initially drew me in. But, I also find it very hard to let go of things that I make for myself. It is probably a reflection of the process.

What is your ideal creative activity?

Yoga is a really good time. It’s a time where I let go. Somebody else is telling me what to do and in a way I am not in charge. I really think that every single moment there is Something there. Even if you are just at the bus stop doing nothing there is still something there that you can take away from it. if you don’t take-in the moment then you are just going.

Which artists do you most admire?

It changes but I always resonate with performance and installation artists. I like things that are temporary and relevant to space. The short term nature of things sets up interesting responses.

What is your creative ambition?

I want to make what I am doing now and figure out how to change it. I want to change the pace and the scale. Right now I make things fast, small, and in multiples to make a large piece. I want to slow down the making -- I don’t know where that is going to take the work necessarily.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

I like making and I will just make as a default. I should think during that time and slow it down. You go to what you like to do. I need to say ‘this is the time for stretching a new muscle.’

How do you begin your day?

I try and have a period of time where I am not doing anything. I am not talking to anybody. Our home looks out at the bay when the sun is rising. The color change on the water is just amazing. And I am trying to do a little more listening, specifically to podcasts.

 

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

I don’t think I do. I really like doing things differently, not that I always take different routes. I used to be very into control but I really like change. You can’t stop it so instead of fighting it just know things can be fresh and fun. My goal is to embrace it and find ways to change something.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

I don’t seek it out. I enjoy it. I think a lot of times it comes out and it sounds good. That's a good creative activity but I don't know it always translates into anything. it can be forced.

“My door is always open. I am perfectly happy to have people stop by. You never know who you are going to meet are what’s going to happen.” If you should find your way up to the third floor at Maryland Hall feel free to peek into Elizabeth’s studio! Studio 310 B.

 

Ralph Crosby, well-known local businessman, will discuss his new book, "Memories of a Main Street Boy:  Growing up in America's Ancient City," on Thursday, December 15 at 6:30 pm at Maryland Hall.  The talk is free and open to the public and will take place in Room 308.  The book will be for sale at the event with proceeds from sales that night going to Maryland Hall.  

A native Annapolitan and 1952 Annapolis High School graduate, Mr. Crosby grew up in an apartment on Main Street. His book tells the story of his growing up during one of the most disruptive, yet most dynamic, eras in our nation’s history – from the end of the Great Depression, through World War II to the Cold War – and how that impacted his generation on Main Streets across America.

Throughout the book, Mr. Crosby weaves in historic Colonial references to the places, people and events that shaped early Annapolis. He also talks about his days at Annapolis High School, now Maryland Hall, which makes the venue for the December 15 event particularly appropriate.

Mr. Crosby’s book can be purchased on December 15, in advance on Amazon.com or at Back Creek Books or Annapolis Bookstore in downtown Annapolis.   

Mr. Crosby is founder and chairman of Crosby Marketing Communications, a nationally recognized public relations/advertising firm located in Annapolis. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and a former journalist who has also published two other books.

 

 

  

An Interview with Emily Welsh

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I am taking ideas and themes from older projects and working them into new projects while I am here. I went to school for printmaking. I liked intaglio on copper the best. They had a brand new studio where I went to school and they were just getting a bunch of non-toxic things. My apartment is small and I wanted to get back into printmaking. I have been elbows deep in work which lent me to be in the music industry and night-life.

I was doing a lot of sketches in bars and with musicians. I had this idea to create the sketches into prints and develop them into a more finished project. Because I have been so heavily involved in work I have not been able to express myself the way I used to so having my studio at Maryland Hall has been great.

What are the primary materials that you use?  

Pen and watercolor for the initial sketches I have been doing. I carry a small cheap ten color watercolor kit. For the prints I use copper plates and ink - typically black and white. I might experiment with color this go around though.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

Probably my art teacher from middle school. It was around Easter time and I came home with these really intricate drawings of “Eggtown” and I did everything cars, buildings, etc. In elementary school art was prominent. In Middle school, the curriculum changed and for some reason art was lost somewhere.  I was more science oriented. In highschool I went back to taking art classes.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

Any of Jeff Koons balloon animal sculptures mainly because I wish the large scale is something I could do. I just don’t have the means to really do that. I want to create a mechanical menagerie and have these large scale mechanical animals. They would probably be paper mache but I will refine the technique from my previous paper mache endeavors.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?

It has been great being here. I live with two other people and they have  turned our kitchen table into a craft center.For me, it’s really just creating a mess and not cleaning it up. So, it has been really nice to have a studio where I come back to everything where I left it. I was an AIR in the past as well and I came into that residency with no expectations. It both was and wasn’t what I was thinking.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

I think if i don’t like the process then I won’t like the result. [In printmaking] you have to prepare the plate in such a way first or the rest of the system won’t work. If you miss a step the acid won’t set or the ink won’t dry, and so on. I become somewhat obsessed with the process. I can tell going to a bar if the process is going to work based on who is there, what music it is, what bar I’m at, etc.

What is your ideal creative activity?

Driving. I had the grand scheme of finding a studio space and etching these drawings when I was on a really long drive. It has happened multiple times - on the jersey turnpike when I have been by myself long enough that my mind starts turning and I want to pull over and start writing all these things down.

Which artists do you most admire?

I have been heavily influenced by illustrators. My grandmother had the older version of the old Wizard of Oz stories. Some are full color illustrations and some are just black and white. the whole fantastical themes stuck with me.

My favorite artists are

Quentin Blake - Roaldl Dahl Books

Hilary Knight - Elouise

W.W. Denslow - Wizard of Oz

Edward Gorey -  The Gashlycrumb Tinies

What is something you are proud of that you have created in the past?

The Electric Elephant is a book that my grandfather wrote. It was based on another story with the same title. He wrote 50 pages filled with stories and they always incorporated me and my 3 cousins, Kate, Sam, and Grace on an adventure. I illustrated the whole book.

Who are some of your role models?

Outside of my parents it would be some of the people I worked with previously. I worked at Rams Head and met a lot of really incredible tour managers. A lot of the female tour managers were really influential in a really man-dominated industry.

 

What is your creative ambition?

A mechanical menagerie based off of my animal prints is definitely something to work towards.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

Space and size. When I was working on the elephant the last time I was here, I wanted to do an art installation kind of art walk. At the time there were a lot of unfortunate empty storefront spaces in Historic Annapolis. I would like to use those spaces at some point and create random areas for art installations. It would include a pop-up art walk.

How do you begin your day?

Currently just setting a loose plan for the day. Trying to get into a routine.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

Circles are definitely repetitive in my art. If you look through any of my sketchbooks you will see them everywhere.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

Outside of doing these portraits of people at bars there was not a lot of dialog like that at work. But, I do rely on a conversation to further what I am doing. I like it to be someone who is far away from the process and from me. Sometimes it takes someone, who has no idea about my work, that asks me a question that sparks an answer or another way to see or do things.

Ignite Annapolis #2 Announced: Call for Presentations

International Phenomenon returns to Annapolis

5 Minutes, 20 slides. What would you say to Annapolis? Enlighten us, but make it quick.

Organizers Kris Valerio Shock, Liz Thibodeau, Kathleen Booth and Gavin Buckley are excited to announce the second Ignite Annapolis event is scheduled to take place from 7:00-9:00pm on Wednesday, November 30th at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. 

If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say to Annapolis? What if you only got 20 slides and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Following an initial Ignite Annapolis event in 2009 and subsequent hugely successful Ignite events in Baltimore and Howard County, on November 30th at 7 pm, 16 artists, technologists, entrepreneurs, and philosophers will answer this challenge at Ignite Annapolis #2. The event will be held at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, at 801 Chase Street, Annapolis, MD. 

More Information

PDF

 

Annapolis Young Artist Program (AYAP) Interview with Natalie Spehar (NS) - interviewed by Emily Kohlenstein (EK)

EK - Let’s start by talking about your background...Where you grew up and how you got started playing music.

NS - I grew up in Northeast Ohio and spent much time in Cleveland studying music and watching The Cleveland Orchestra. I had a pretty eclectic musical upbringing … In addition to other full-time work, my dad is an accordion player and my mom is a singer. Growing up, I spent a lot of time in my uncle’s recording studio as well, listening to rock and metal bands I probably wouldn't have heard of otherwise, especially at a young age. At age four I started classical piano lessons and aural skills class. When I was ten, the high school orchestra came to play for my elementary school class and I immediately fell in love with the cello. I went home that day and told my mom that’s what I wanted to play. She rented me a cello that week, and things pretty much took off from there.

I think because I already had a lot of musical experience when I picked up the cello and could read music, I learned quickly and was able to start recording a couple years into my studies. My uncle would rope me into projects in his studio and also threw me into a contemporary folk band, where I learned how to improvise. I continued to pursue formal classical training as well.

EK - Do you write your own music now, after all of that?

NS - I have composed a few songs and arranged many projects. Usually, though, I find myself improvising in a studio setting or interpreting other composers’ repertoire.

 

EK - Was there ever a time where you thought 'I don't know if music is exactly what I want to pursue as a lasting career?'

NS - Yes --  I have always loved medicine and still like to read medical journals and articles. I know a lot of other musicians have those shared interests... there are actually a few amateur adult orchestras made up of doctors! Many of the kids I grew up with did take a medical career route. I knew I couldn’t live without music being my focus, though, and decided after my sophomore year of high school to pursue it full time.

EK - That brings us to AYAP... how did that come into the mix of being a musician? Did you always know you wanted to work with kids?

NS - I think what draws me so much to live instrumental performance is the intense amount of communication required, and that it most often must happen without using words. With words out of the way, you must physically move more and create with great intent and openness in order to achieve an experience that draws other people in. You also must be open to what your other collaborators are sending your way, and be able to sit back, listen and respond meaningfully with your instrument.  It is always a challenge - and a reward - to connect with other people on that level and it is an excellent exercise in being an effective communicator and leader.

Those experiences shape the way that I listen to and connect with people in general, including kids. In highschool, I formed a volunteer quartet that would play at libraries and present free children’s shows. Since then, I have regularly pursued that kind of teaching and outreach work with young audiences and it over time inspired the idea for AYAP. When I moved to Annapolis and it came time for me to build a private cello studio here, I wanted to create something that was a well-rounded experience -- that introduced my current students not only to great musical repertoire but also to what I think is the overall most important part of being a musician: the joy of connecting with other people.

EK - One of the obvious objectives of AYAP students is performance skill but the other is civic leadership. One does not always see that in a young audience outreach environment. Why did you decide to include that in your curriculum?

NS - I participated in an Arts Leadership Program during my undergrad studies at Eastman School of Music and was exposed to every aspect of what was going to be vital in a professional performance career. I was so thankful for that training because I learned basics of grant writing and took accounting classes on my own, which are both skills I use weekly in running my own program. At ESM, we were also mentored as performance majors by the Ying quartet, who worked with us to develop outreach programs for local elementary schools and assisted living centers. They pushed us to be active collaborators out in the community and that shaped my professional life so much and influenced the way I interact with other people in general. I figured, why not start this training with even younger musicians! It is invaluable information that makes the experience of sharing music that much more rewarding.

As a result of that training, I also discovered that my passion for music could be a force that I use to address other social and community needs -- outside of the music world. For example, my outreach work with music at Maryland Hall has now developed into weekly, free music programming that serves at-risk youth in the area as well as public school students being mentored by our local juvenile justice system. In these situations, music is far more than a fun group activity -- it is teaching collaborative abilities, career skills and leadership concepts that will benefit students in any eventual professional setting. Several of the AYAP students have volunteered to coach these beginning music classes at Maryland Hall and have also taken initiative to create similar, small-group outreach initiatives in the community.

 

EK - Can you explain the new relationship between AYAP and Maryland Hall?

NS - To now have access to such inspiring facilities [at Maryland Hall] and an entirely new audience of people in Annapolis is wonderful and has greatly expanded the opportunities for our AYAP students. Over the years, we have been able to host phenomenal performers from across the country including local musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, and Annapolis Symphony. With Maryland Hall being an important intersection of community arts organizations, our circle continues to expand and we are grateful for that! Maryland Hall is the ideal educational environment for AYAP’s activities and we feel privileged to now be officially operating as a part of Maryland Hall’s outreach program.

EK - Do you choose what events the kids should volunteer for?

NS - What draws a lot of students to the program is our initiative called AYAP Reach, which is a student-led effort to serve the community through volunteer musical work. AYAP faculty serve as mentors for the initiative, but the participating students are the ones tackling the creative as well as administrative responsibilities for most local performances that they present.

I’ve found that when students come in the door and are expected to collaborate at a professional level, something exciting happens -- the kids take pride in their roles and tend to go above and beyond what we expected, creating extra-innovative aspects of their art and new opportunities for their peers. I can facilitate those opportunities and mentor along the way, but do not assign students to specific activities. I simply include those that find the project meaningful and are motivated to help.

EK - Is the program currently open to members of Maryland Hall?

NS - It is open to all young musicians in our community, ages 12-18. AYAP hosts events year-round at Maryland Hall, providing a workshop and masterclass series during the academic year and a Summer String Institute in August, both of which can be registered for at www.marylandhall.org.

AYAP Reach functions year-round in a club format and new members are always welcome! The group meets on the first Saturday of each month for a formal student meeting and then performs and volunteers at local community events throughout the month. For more information about AYAP Reach, please feel free to inquire via email at info@annapolisyap.com.

EK - Can you talk about the Urban Initiative?

NS - A couple of years ago, AYAP started a collaboration with a Capitol Heights, Maryland branch of a national non-profit organization called Urban Initiatives. I was deeply impressed by their effective programming for local citizens in need, which included nutrition information class, summer camp, and a GED class for parents. AYAP teamed up with them to create a music addition to that programming, offering free string mini-camps with local children [in Capital Heights]. During a mini-camp, the kids come for 2 hours every day after school. Some have never played an instrument before so it is very fun and interesting for them. After two weeks, we perform a community concert in which they present individual solos learned as well as a group orchestra piece. It is such an awesome experience for all involved and we look forward to collaborating again soon!

EK - Is there a way people can donate to the program?

NS - Absolutely. We are thrilled to accept instrument donations or funding toward the maintenance of the instruments that we do own  -- we currently have several violins, guitars and a piano and use them daily.  Financial support of our Outreach Program at Maryland Hall in general is of course always appreciated and used to create important opportunities for youth in our community.  Thank you for your continued support!

For further information on funding opportunities and the meaningful influence that has on our outreach programming, please feel free to contact nspehar@mdhallarts.org.

 

 

 

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Music Together Chesapeake teachers

Christine Brimhall graduated from the Hartt School of Music (University of Hartford) with a Bachelors degree in both flute performance and music education. She continued her flute studies at Yale University, receiving her Master of Music in Flute Performance. Christine taught instrumental music in Prince George's County, Maryland for six years. As a music educator, she values the importance of early childhood music education and embraces family music making. Christine has participated in Music Together programs with her two daughters and started teaching Music Together in Fall 2011.  In July 2013 she completed a three-day refresher training, and earned her Music Together Certification I in July of 2014. 

Mandy Stinchcomb has a Bachelor's degree in Theatre from Goucher College in Baltimore. She began singing in choral groups over 17 years ago, and has had a love of music ever since. Mandy  has been participating in Music Together with her children since 2004, and has greatly enjoyed sharing music with her three children through the program. She completed her teacher training in the summer of 2008, and has been teaching family classes since the fall of that year.  Mandy has also taught Music Together In-school in Pasadena, MD. 

Art class Instructors

Holly Rosario was born in rural upstate New York, and spent her childhood exploring its forested terrain. Introverted and aesthetically curious by nature, Holly was interested in art from a young age. In 2007 she moved to Baltimore to attend the Maryland Institute College of Art where she pursued her Bachelors of Fine Arts in conjunction with a Master of Arts in Teaching. While at MICA, she developed an interest in watercolor, inks, paper cuts, and ceramics as well as a passion for art history.  As an artist, Rosario’s papercut works and watercolors are inspired by a love of nature on its most minuscule levels, and explore the role of pattern and repetition in the processes of growth and decay.  Rosario spent three years as an Elementary Art Teacher with Baltimore County Public Schools and is excited to continue her teaching at Maryland Hall.  She sees her pursuits as artist and educator as inseparably intertwined, and hopes to facilitate transformative learning by sharing her passion for the visual world.  She will be teaching visual arts classes for children.  

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