Inside the Hall: Maryland Hall News Blog

Enter the Arts Alive raffle to win one of these extravagant trips.

Raffle tickets are $100 each!

Only 200 tickets will be sold!

 

Drawing: September 11 at Arts Alive 17 at Maryland Hall 

Winner need not be present. Raffle winner picks the trip of their choice.

Some restrictions apply including blackout dates.

 

Click here to download an order form to enter the Arts Alive Raffle.    

 

Click here for information about Arts Alive!

 

Trip Option #1:  Milan Marriott Hotel, Milan, Italy, 5 Night Stay and Airfare for 2
The Milan Marriott is a 10-minutes walk from the Milan Exhibition city centre and a few minutes from Milan city centre. Visit the temple of football, the "San Siro Stadium," the historical part of the city where you can see DaVinci’s “Last Supper” and more! 
 
Trip Option #2:  Los Suenos Marriott Ocean & Golf Resort in Costa Rica, 5 Night Stay and Airfare for 2
Recognized by Travel & Leisure magazine one of the "World's Best", the Los Suenos Marriott Ocean & Golf Resort features 6 restaurants and lounges, La Iguana Golf Course, Stellaris Casino, and the new Sibö Rainforest Spa & Retreat, all in magnificent settings that heighten the experience. A memorable vacation awaits, whether you prefer gliding from tree to tree on a canopy tour or just sitting back and relaxing along our palm lined free-form pool.
 
Trip Option #3:  Hyatt Regency Tokyo, Japan, 6 Night Stay and Airfare for 2
The Hotel Hyatt Regency Tokyo is located in a thriving business, shopping and entertainment district and home to the most select Tokyo hotels. The 5 star Hyatt Regency hotel in Tokyo is ideally located next to the Shinjuku Central Park, and within short distance of the Shinjuku Imperial Gardens, Meiji Shrine, Odakyu store, and the fashionable Shibuya ward. The hotel is conveniently close to Shinjuku Station, with links to the Tokyo subway.
 
Trip Option #4:  Pebble Beach and Carmel Resorts Golf Package with Airfare for 2
Includes two night Garden View Room Stay at The Inn at Spanish Bay at Pebble Beach, round of golf including cart at Pebble Beach Links for 2; a two night stay at the Hyatt Carmel-Highland Inn; $250 Budget Rental Car Certificate and round trip airline service for 2 to either San Francisco or San Jose, CA. 
 
Trip Option #5:  Vatican Museums/Sistine Chapel Tour, 5 Night Stay in Rome, and Airfare for 2
Experience Michelangelo’s exquisite Sistine Chapel and take a tour of the Vatican Museums on this 5 night stay in Rome at the Marriott Park Hotel. Take a shuttle downtown to climb the Spanish Steps, wander the Coliseum, and make your wish at the Trevi Fountain.

 

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I’m a bit of a scattered worker when it comes to inspiration.  At the moment I have several pieces in the works for my November show ‘Heirloom,’ as well as a large piece I’ve just started for my own enjoyment.  I find great inspiration in the subconscious, so I’ve decided to put some of my more vivid dreams onto canvas.  I’ve decided to work exclusively from life this June and have already completed several smaller pieces just to keep limber and bright.  

What are the primary materials that you use?

Oil on a wooden panel or scrap is my favorite combination.  I love the heaviness of the piece when I’m finished and the stand-alone capability for thicker slabs.  The paint looks more sumptuous on a block than a canvas, and repurposing the wood factors into the philosophy behind my work.    

What’s your earliest memory of art?

Of personal art? I remember being told by a kindergarten teacher not to embellish my work on the edges - I was a doodler- telling me that such behavior would not prepare me for the reality of the school work to come.  Needless to say I doodled in textbooks and handouts for the duration of my education right on into adulthood.  
As for the greater world of art, I remember my father taking me to his then job at The National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  We went behind the scenes into the conservation studio and I found myself standing right in front of one of the Degas little dancer sculptures.  I remember these studious people in white coats and gloves treating her with delicate little brushes while taking copious notes.  I knew at that moment that I wanted to work closely with the museum collections of this world.  

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

Any John Singer Sargent watercolor.  I can replicate a space on paper or canvas, but he had a way of making light and color surreally effortless.  His innate ability takes my breath away.

How do you know when a work is finished?

When I still like it.  I have a tendency to work in hyper detail, and I’m trying to break away from this.  The pieces I’ve loved the most are looser with true and vivid color.  I’ve put pieces away for years before attempting to touch them again because I’ve painted myself into a corner.  Detail is a tricky mistress. 

How has your time as an AIR been?  Was it how you expected?

Lovely so far.  I’m about a third of the way into my 3 year term, and what I’ve loved most about it is the collective atmosphere of such varying styles all in one place.  I’ve reached out for input on many pieces and received some much-needed criticism.  I’ve also found inspiration in others whose styles could not be further from my own.   The space and the light is inspiring every time I walk into my studio.  Before I moved into this space I had been painting out of my home, which isn’t conducive to an open and creative mind.  There’s also something inspiring about being around so many rooms filled with people creating, learning, singing, and dancing.  Though the hallways may be loud at times there’s something wonderful about knowing this artistic hub is thriving and inspiring people in this city.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

The process.  I love taking out my paints and surveying the space, and seeing the work take shape.  I love that satisfying moment when the brush applies one stroke and the color is perfection.  I tend to feel excited but a bit sad when I finish a piece I adore.  Almost like finishing a good book.  You feel satisfied and inspired at the close, and yet there’s melancholy for having to set it aside and find the next great read.  

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

I always coat my boards and canvas in a red/orange layer.  Pieces without it lack warmth, and I find that I like a peek of brilliant color when I leave it untouched at the edges. I listen to nothing but soundtracks when I paint.  I prefer wordless music to talk radio in the studio.  News, books, a chat on NPR- all of these keep me rooted and I prefer to drift when I work.    

What is your ideal creative activity?

A run or hike somewhere beautiful in nature to find a good sketching spot.  I keep a trusy moleskine notebook in my purse for such times.  Nothing trumps sun and open air.  

Which artists do you most admire?

John Singer Sargent and John William Waterhouse are and have always been two of my favorite painters.  Both painted with such authority.  Sargent handled watercolors like no other artist before or since- I have always envied his ability to convey a space, especially those covered in dappled light.  There’s a looseness about his work that continues to inspire and frustrate me.  Waterhouse caters more to my 10 year old self who retreated into trees with a good book to dream of knights and dragons.  His work more controlled but lovely.  Alan Lee began inspiring me around the same time frame- there’s an eerie beauty to his work.  There’s something to be said for someone with his illustrative capability who still works on paper and not a computer. 

Does anyone in your life regularly inspire you?

Too many to enumerate here, but oh lord yes.  I’ve somehow lucked into knowing and being related to some true gems.  A writer, who inspires me to keep my mind open to new materials and the lives around me.  A painter, who keeps a meticulous record of her life and travels in some unbelievably illustrated notebooks.  A gardening enthusiast who keeps my eyes open to the possible uses of forgotten things.  A traveler who keeps my spirit open to the vastness of the world I have yet to experience and be inspired by.  

What is your creative ambition?

I want to create work without pausing to contemplate a pieces usefulness or reception by others.  I crave a truly inspired method of creation that I can feel with every piece.  

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

My own tempestuous nature.   Keeping to a plan is a mechanism that allows me to create without becoming to frustrated with mediocre work.  I think most artists suffer with that internal knowledge that not everything we create is going to be a success, whether by outside standards or our own.  Letting go of that innate worry is I hope something that will grow with time.

How do you begin your day?

Coffee.  An open window.   If I’ve been reading a new book, a few chapters.  

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

Absolutely.  We all need feedback and a sounding board.  I don’t consult any one person, but have found great input in the other AIR’s since moving into my space.  I have many friends abroad and it can be helpful to suss out ideas with those who have been trained using completely different methods.  I’ll never be so convinced of my own work that I can’t still grow and learn from those around me.    

 

For more information about Anne, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

The Maryland arts community was stunned to learn that Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts was singled out as the only non-profit to have its funding deleted from the recently approved state capital budget.  This capital project funding was approved by the General Assembly – Republican and Democrats – to continue capability enhancements and renovations at Maryland Hall, including improvements to make the community arts center more accessible for those with disabilities.  This unprecedented action will harm the thousands of patrons, students, artists, volunteers, parents and supporters of Maryland Hall who benefit from this treasure in our community.  The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Theatre of Maryland, Annapolis Opera, Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra and Annapolis Chorale are all partners in the ongoing project to update Maryland Hall, and will be impacted from any delay caused by this significant cut in state funding.  We urge that the money be restored so that Maryland Hall can continue to enrich the community and transform lives.  We appreciate the continued support of the elected officials and community members who value Maryland Hall and regard the funding of arts, communities and education as a priority.

                                    Theatre Patron Wing                                                           Theatre Production Wing – Act 2
 

The Campaign for Maryland Hall is a five-year $18 million capital campaign to modernize and expand Maryland Hall, the region’s premier arts center.  We have already completed an upgrade of the main theatre (Act 1) and have made substantial progress with public and private funding sources so that we might soon begin Act 2 which will include the first major construction at Maryland Hall since 1932. But we need everyone’s support!

Thank you to the many community members who have already invested in this important project to expand, add capabilities and modernize Maryland Hall.  Please encourage everyone in the community to provide financial support – large or small – to help Maryland Hall engage more people.  Nothing speaks louder than action.  Over 100 individuals and all of the Boards of 4 of the 5 resident companies have contributed to the Capital Campaign just this year – demonstrating support for the planned improvements for Maryland Hall to enhance important mission delivery.

To contribute to The Campaign for Maryland Hall, click here. For more information, call 410-263-5544 ext. 26 or email capitalcampaign@mdhallarts.org

www.freestaterblog.blogspot.com

Maryland Hall’s Summer Concert series returns with another season of great music outside on our front lawn and labyrinth. Fun for all ages, bring your lawn chair or blanket and mark your calendar for our annual summer concerts! All concerts are free and no tickets are required. Wine, beer and food will be available for purchase. 


Sponsored by RPH Architecture
With additional support from Deborah Love in memory of Joe and Jackie Sachs.

 

Deanna Bogart
Thursday, June 18 | 6 pm
Deanna Bogart is an award-winning multi-instrumentalist and multifaceted musician. Bogart combines the best of boogie-woogie, contemporary blues, country and jazz into a splendid blend she calls “blusion.”

 

Blue Rhythm Boys 
Thursday, July 9 | 6:30 pm
Blending the blues of Mississippi John Hurt with the "hot club" swing of Django Reinhardt, the Blue Rhythm Boys have delighted audiences with their tight vocals and hot guitar playing since 1997. Tom Mitchell (vocal,guitar), Jim Stephanson(vocal, guitar), Vince McCool (trumpet) and John Previti (upright bass) bring authenticity and originality to their own smoky mix of hot jazz, blues and hokum.  

 

 

Afro Bop Alliance
Thursday, July 30 | 6:30 pm
Latin Grammy Award-winning group Afro Bop Alliance is an Afro-Cuban jazz ensemble based in Washington, DC.

 

 

Craig Gildner and The Blue Sky 5
Thursday, August 13 | 6:30 pm
Craig Gildner and The Blue Sky 5 perform vintage jazz and swing music made popular by Count Basie, Nat Cole, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman and Artie Shaw.

 

 

 

 

 

Interview conducted by Gallery Director, Sigrid Trumpy.

 

What projects are you working on at the moment?
I am currently working on a series of six paintings entitled Body of Water. There are three large-scale paintings and three small, which depict the human form merged with water – ocean, bay and tributary. The concept is to unify the human form with these bodies of water to demonstrate how interconnected we are.

What are the primary materials that you use?
I use oil paint directly from the tube or can, occasionally mixed with plaster, wax or linseed oil to give it some texture.  I work on triple primed canvases. My larger works are up to 5' x 5' and small around 30" x 40."  In order to get the desired affect, I use a variety of palate knives and filbert brushes.

What's your earliest memory of art?
My earliest memory of art is my mother bringing home a landscape painting when I was about 5 years old, followed by her painting of a vegetable still life in oil. It was a very small canvas and tightly worked, realistic in style.  Around the same age, I recall watching my grandfather handcraft a violin.  I remember feeling in awe of him, and knowing at that time I wanted to learn how to create something from nothing.

What work of art do you most wish you'd made?
Great question.  A painting, Marc Rothko's White Center.

How do you know when a work is finished?
Something I learned early on is a work is not finished when someone else thinks you’re finished; it’s about how you, as the artist, feel. To me something is finished when I feel a connection with the work, that it’s able to communicate what I had intended it to communicate.  

How has your time as an AIR been?  Was it how you expected?
My time as an artist-in-residence has been extremely satisfying. I’ve enjoyed the studio space – the scale, the light – as well as having the opportunity to connect with the other AIRs and learn from each other.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?
I choose the result.  The process of laying and shaping paint can be tedious, followed by the tightening and enclosing of the shapes. Perhaps like designing a room, or making a paella, the assembly process is long and often wrought with challenges, but the result is well worth it.

What are your habits?  What patterns do you repeat?
I tend to repeat a combination of smooth and heavy/relief surfaces with paint. Additionally, I float the edges, providing a frame-like finish.  I work left to middle, then right to middle, using both hands.  

What is your ideal creative activity?
Painting.  Alone. Or, with a book-on-tape.

Which artists do you most admire?
Louise Bourgeois for her range of work and feministic themes.  Holding Sunday Salon's - a crit. for student's and creating the movement of confession art.  I love her spider sculpture in DC. Helen Frankenhaler for her gorgeous stain paintings and the first artist who introduced me to the color field style. Also, locally, Claire McCardle for working with marble, which frightens me.

Does anyone in your life regularly inspire you?
A childhood friend, a New Yorker, who embodies "the art of living beautifully." 

What is your creative ambition?
I would like to have a greater presence in commercial spaces. Most of my work is large-scale and lends itself to open, public spaces.

I also have an aspiration for the local arts community as a whole.  Artists are challenged to find the right environment to learn, create, and be inspired to hone their craft. My hope is someday we could identify a benefactor to support local artists by dedicating a building to studio and gallery spaces. Think the Arts Tower in Baltimore (Bromo Seltzer tower). 

What are the obstacles to this ambition?
Regarding my personal ambition, it's simply about finding the time - and mental energy- to develop a greater presence on social media in order to engage with architects, commercial builders, etc., instead of going through a dealer to form those relationships.

In terms of community outreach, Annapolis is fast recognizable as an artist haven. Given that, it just comes down to the funding. Build it and we will fill it.

How do you begin your day?
I always start with coffee and the NYTimes, followed by walking my dog, Scout.  I use that time to mentally plan how I'm going to use the studio time for the day.  I try to walk from my home in Eastport to the studio at least a couple times a week to clear my mind.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?
It is important.  Painting is a singular vocation, and although I'm comfortable with alone time, I do feel outlets for shared passion are vital.  Art speak is in everything -fashion, food, travel, architecture and design.  Perhaps "Sunday Salon" needs continuance.

 

For more information about Lorraine, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Artists That Have Influenced My Work

by Patrice Drago

I appreciate all of the masters of early days and today, and I'm grateful for the exposure I have had both academically and independently to such a large quantity and wide variety of incredible work.  Out of all of them, there are two artists that always come to mind that captured my attention and never lost it.

When I was painting still life, landscapes and figure in oil, the single greatest influence on my work was Caravaggio.  While his paintings were often depictions of disturbing events, (see the image), it was how the drama was emphasized that fascinated me.  "Chiaroscuro" - the sharp contrast of light and dark - was exciting, and it demonstrated how to create focus in a composition with contrasting light and dark in the right places.  I remember walking into the Basilica of Santa Maria del Popolo in Rome, and immediately noticing - over everything else - a Caravaggio painting in the Cerasi Chapel on the left, with a tiny light on it.  It glowed and even though it was almost completely sideways to my view, it was all I could see.

  

"The Incredulity of Saint Thomas" 1601-2 by Caravaggio

For me, creating dark shadows with purple is far more exciting than black, and my art mentor at the time really pointed that out for me.  For the ten + years I painted exclusively in oil, I never once used a black pigment. I only used Dioxazine Purple for shadows, because shadows aren't really black; there is always color.  Even though I have gone back to painting abstracts, I still use dark and light contrast.  

I am and have always been in love with the Abstract Expressionist movement, making it hard to single out one artist.  But one painting had a huge impact on me, and it was Sam Francis' "Middle Blue".  When I saw it in the MOMA San Francisco, everything else I saw fell away and I felt like I was home.  The colors, the line, the white - the entire composition and the combination of colors were so familiar - it felt like a painting of my soul.  A series called "Breakthrough", which was my return to abstract after a long hiatus (since college) clearly shows Sam Francis' influence on my work.  

"Middle Blue" by Sam Francis

All of it has brought me to a place where I feel I am truly painting from what is a combination of all of my experiences.  A healthy curiosity and a never-ending desire to always learn more ensures my work will continue to evolve.  

 

For more information about Patrice, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Coffee & Conversations with Franz K and Robert M by Patrice Drago

I knew I wanted to do a very large abstract painting about coffee, since my caffeine intake has been increasing steadily.  I started with a 48" x 48" canvas, I took a few long sweeps with a very large brush.  I felt like Franz Kline had just shown up. (below left)

I added Titanium Buff to suggest cream.  Five years ago, I bought this amazing sheet of waxy paper with wire running through it, and never had a place to use it - until now.  I love that it is heavy duty, but you can still see the brown paint underneath. (above center)

I felt like it needed a blue shape - bold but soft.  I added it, and then felt Robert Motherwell had just joined Franz and me.  The idea of the painting emerged - If I could go back in time, I would love to have coffee with these two iconic American Abstract Expressionists.  So what would we talk about? (above right)

On a very large table, I set up my supplies and pulled out dozens of magazines, books, music sheets and catalogs, and completely immersed myself in finding images and text that would imply, symbolize and directly state topics that we would cover if we had unlimited coffee and time to chat. 

Because this canvas is so large, I had to get on a ladder to take pictures as I arranged and rearranged the collage items to find the right placement. I always take pictures of paintings in progress to give me a different and framed perspective on it; for this part of the process, I took over 100 pictures, having fun with the conversation in my head. 

At this point, I knew I needed to expand the blue for a more balanced composition, but I wasn't ready to paint it, because I wanted it to lay on top of the finished collage, and I wasn't there yet.  I took painter's tape and laid it down, moving it around until it was where I wanted the final paint stroke to be.

After fixing all of the collage items, I replaced the tape with blue paint. (above left)

To finish the painting, I added white paint with large amount of pure soap, shaken to create bubbles for the froth.  I then added interference violet in streaks through the cream to signify some exciting moments of conversation. (above right)

Now I can't wait to get in my time machine and invite more great people in history to have coffee and conversation.

 

For more information about Patrice, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Patrice Drago takes you on a tour of her studio in Studio 305A.

When you first walk in to my studio, you are facing a partial wall with a banner welcoming you to my studio.  I chose the detail of “Elation”, a recent painting because the color combination of blue, yellow and white are inviting and exciting.  When I am working large, I use that wall as an easel, which is my favorite way to paint.  It’s very freeing not to use an easel.  


                
I love to be surrounded by color, texture and things that I love.  I arrange my studio much like I do a room in my house, so that it is inviting and beautiful.  I have lamps in the corners, and peppered throughout the space because I prefer incandescent light or the new warm LED light to fluorescent.  I do not use the overhead lights.  My studio gets plenty of indirect light due to the openness and the partial wall separating my studio from Merla’s.  My paintings hang on several of the walls.


 
Since I use decorative papers in my collage paintings, I have put dowels on c-hooks and hang the papers from the dowels so I can always see what I have available to me.  The papers are so beautiful, and the combinations of wildly different patterns and colors are inspirational, and just plain lovely to view.

Just like the papers, I need to have visual access to everything I use.  I carefully selected a shelving unit that allows me to organize the paints and still see everything at a glance.

I use the long table in my studio for multiple projects and for adding layers to paintings that are in various stages of development.  I bought these terrific casters at Home Depot that fit under the table legs so I can move the table around as needed, since I have to make the most of the small space that I have.   My painting cart is also on wheels.  

These are my favorite painting tools… When I do use brushes, my favorite are the really large ones.

I use acrylic markers all the time.  They are great for line, for filling in small areas, and for detail.  And tucked into this little shelving unit are some of the most fascinating and luscious mediums that make acrylic painting so much fun – glass beads, white flake, pumice gel, molding paste, clear tar gel… and I use them all!

 

For more information about Patrice, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Interview conducted by Gallery Director, Sigrid Trumpy.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

Art was always a part of my academic life starting in the second grade with life-like paper mache animals and musical instruments. I still remember vividly the experience of creating them.  In our free time my sister and I would create paper mosaic pictures and paintings with glitter and collage.  By age nine, I won an award for an abstract painting.  

When I was 14, my friend’s mom tacked a sheet to her kitchen wall. With a bucket of black paint, and a bucket of white, she handed me house-painting brushes and said “Paint!”  I never felt freer in my life.  Though I didn’t know the Abstract Expressionists at the time, you might look at those huge paintings – rough as they were - and say that Franz Kline was whispering in one ear, and Robert Motherwell in the other. I continued with art in high school, college, and beyond, but didn’t think of it as a career until many years later.

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I work on numerous projects simultaneously.  My inspirations come in such floods that if I don’t start something when I am feeling it, it will dissipate into the ethers.  Out of the 20 to 30 ideas that hit me on any given day, those that get my full focus and take hold are ones that promise to be visually exciting or meaningful in a positive way.  

Right now I am focused on creating large abstract works free from the confines of a specific theme.  My current exhibit, “Balanced Distractions” is a collection of paintings that reflect a variety of moods, from dynamic movement to quiet reflection to multi-layered collage paintings with multiple interpretations. 

Another direction I am pursuing is a series called “Coffee and Conversations with…”, which started with “Coffee and Conversations with Franz K. and Robert M.”  This 48” x 48” painting is an abstract-collage suggesting coffee through the use of color and texture, and I’ve collaged in text and pictures the topics I would want to discuss if I were lucky enough to conversation over coffee with these two iconic American Abstract Expressionists.  I’m now having fun making a list of the people – past and present – with whom I’d love to have a conversation over coffee.

To balance out the large paintings, I work on small pieces such as abstract landscapes or animals.  I’ve retired my songbird series, and I will start a new animal series of African animals, starting with cheetahs.  

I am also working on the illustrations for my book “Shannon, the Magic Carpet Dog,” based on my own precious Chow/American Eskimo.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

I don’t think I could paint if I didn’t enjoy the process.  I’m not saying I haven’t had moments of complete and utter frustration, and wanting to give up on a piece.  More than once I’ve had to gesso over or even discard a canvas during the development of a commissioned painting because the direction went south.  It goes awry because I get focused on the result.  Once I settle in and let the painting unfold organically, it becomes a rewarding experience, and I am ultimately happy with the result.  

How do you know when a work is finished?

A few paintings flow from start to finish with a definite conclusion.  With most works however, the only way I can be sure it is finished is to step away from it completely for at least three days.  Then when I see it again it’s like seeing it for the first time, and if something still needs resolution it pops out immediately, like there is a bright spotlight and an arrow pointing to it saying, “Fix me!”  Then I fix it – and that’s when I know I’m done.

Which artists do you most admire?  Why are they your role models?

The list of artists whose work inspires me is pages long.  I love the chiaroscuro of Caravaggio, the energy of Van Gogh, and the playfulness and fabulous colors of Wayne Thiebaud.  I am the most passionate about the American Abstract Expressionists, both in terms of their work and their courage to pave a path that helped the world see art differently.  Love it or hate it, the dialogue continues to this day.  

I am specifically drawn to the art of Sam Francis and Robert Motherwell– I think because I feel a kinship to the positive energy that underlies their work.   

Among artists I know, I have to single out my mentor, Tesia Blackburn.  A San Francisco abstract artist and Golden Paint Working Artist, she is an incredible role model.  Her work is pure and uplifting.  It comes from the soul, and she has true integrity in her art and in her generous spirit of teaching.

Is a creative dialogue important to you and if so, how do you find it and with whom?

Being an artist is a solitary endeavor. I am also a writer, which is another introverted activity.  As an almost extreme extrovert, it is critical for me to not only have the social interaction, but to have meaningful and informative discussions about all things art:  history, art events, trends, new artists, and what is going on in both the local and global art communities. 

To feed my soul and stay continuously refreshed, I maintain art connections in San Francisco, New York, Maine, and metro Washington, DC.  Social media, Art News Magazine and the NY Times Art Section online help me stay current.  I am involved as a volunteer with MFA that has a membership of more 425, and I stay in close touch with the art galleries in town.  I love curating exhibits, because pulling together other artists’ works in a collection is yet another way to view the art. The most exciting way for me to stay connected is meeting artists, experiencing their studios, and getting immersed in exhibits at galleries and museums.  There’s nothing like starting your day with one way of looking at the world, then experiencing someone else’s art and viewing the world through a new lens.  Fabulous.

What is your creative ambition?

My ambition stems from my reason for painting:  I paint to experience and create joy.  Much like my writing, the real goal is that I articulate the message clearly; that a painting truly reflects what I am feeling when I create it.  So what is my ambition?  My goal is to continue to explore new methods and techniques of creating art in the soulful endeavor of bringing pleasure to others.  My best days are when someone sees my work and says, “This is such joyful work!”

I envision some day having my own exhibition space with inspiring views and positive environment for art workshops.  It will probably not be traditional; the vision is still forming.  Bottom line?  To always be involved in the making of, and the writing about art, however it evolves.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

I’ve learned through experience that the only real obstacle is a resistance to change.  All the other things we encounter are only challenges to be dealt with.  Where there is a will, there is a way.  I may have to take a detour, but I never give up on the destination.  And when I reach it, I’ll set another.

 

For more information about Patrice, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall is pleased to announce several new corporate sponsors who will provide valuable operating support for Maryland Hall’s mission-based artistic programs.

New sponsors include the following:

Charles Schwab (Annapolis Branch) and DoubleTree by Hilton Annapolis Hotel will provide general support for Maryland Hall’s performing arts, education and visual arts programming.

RPH Architecture in Annapolis will be the signature sponsor of Maryland Hall’s Summer Outdoor Concert Series which will include four performances from June through August on Maryland Hall’s labyrinth. 

Wells Fargo: Private Bank; Towne Transport and Morgan Stanley are major sponsors of Maryland Hall’s 10th annual All That Art auction fundraiser which will take place on May 1. 

“Sponsors provide valuable revenue to support our mission as a community arts center,” says Linnell Bowen, President of Maryland Hall.  “We are grateful for all our sponsors for investing in Maryland Hall so we can provide art for all in our community.”

Founded in 1979, Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, is the region’s leading arts center, providing opportunities for all ages to explore and enjoy arts education and the performing and visual arts.   

Companies interested in sponsorship should contact Maryland Hall’s Development Office at 410-263-5544, ext. 22 or go to www.marylandhall.org.

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