News

Ralph Crosby, well-known local businessman, will discuss his new book, "Memories of a Main Street Boy:  Growing up in America's Ancient City," on Thursday, December 15 at 6:30 pm at Maryland Hall.  The talk is free and open to the public and will take place in Room 308.  The book will be for sale at the event with proceeds from sales that night going to Maryland Hall.  

A native Annapolitan and 1952 Annapolis High School graduate, Mr. Crosby grew up in an apartment on Main Street. His book tells the story of his growing up during one of the most disruptive, yet most dynamic, eras in our nation’s history – from the end of the Great Depression, through World War II to the Cold War – and how that impacted his generation on Main Streets across America.

Throughout the book, Mr. Crosby weaves in historic Colonial references to the places, people and events that shaped early Annapolis. He also talks about his days at Annapolis High School, now Maryland Hall, which makes the venue for the December 15 event particularly appropriate.

Mr. Crosby’s book can be purchased on December 15, in advance on Amazon.com or at Back Creek Books or Annapolis Bookstore in downtown Annapolis.   

Mr. Crosby is founder and chairman of Crosby Marketing Communications, a nationally recognized public relations/advertising firm located in Annapolis. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and a former journalist who has also published two other books.

 

 

Interview with Elizabeth Kendall

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I just finished a ceiling sculpture for the MGM complex. I moved here over a year ago and didn’t have a studio. I was between projects. Then, a neighbor introduced me to someone who asked for Maryland artists for the MGM project. I got the residency here and everything has snowballed and developed since then.

If I didn’t have a studio here the MGM installation couldn’t have happened. It was great because it was something that will open up a bunch of new ideas and projects. Glass and light are new for me. I just finished a piece through an art consulting firm in Atlanta. Now that those things are over I am focused on ideas for my show at Maryland Hall next November. My framework for that is observations and experiences between my home and the studio.

What are the primary materials that you use?

Clay. I am using more glass and I have used fabric in the past. What I love about any material is that it requires you to use specific tools. you can exchange tools for different things - a belt sander to sand clay, rolling pin from the kitchen. I look at clay like fabric and I am referencing fabric and things from the sewing room.

My grandmother did knitting ,weaving, sewing, basket weaving, etc. so my memories are all of the things from her sewing room. She made clothes for my dolls and such. I don’t like the process as much as I like it in pottery.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

It is a frustrating memory because I had this idea of what good art was. I came to art through craft, through process. I had to get technique into my hands before I could get emotion into the work. I started off at a community center taking a ceramics class. I had a five year plan to become a potter and it evolved from there.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

I feel that all the time when I see things or you look at something and it resonated with you. But almost inevitably when I am done a project then the next the piece is the one I wish I had made. You solve a problem or you work through a process . or you learn something right at the end that you want to put into the next work.

How do you know when a work is finished?

There are stages of doneness. throwing, trimming, rolling it out, drying it out.. all different stage. I don’t always know until the deadline is done or until afterwards. And, often times I think that is what keeps me coming back. Especially with ceramics where you rely on the kiln to help you finish it, things come out unexpected. That’s OK. then you can look at it and say oh that's cool how that came out. I love the serendipity. I also love the control you can get.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?

It has been great to meet other makers and people who are just involved with this community. I moved and it’s far enough that I need to make a new set of paths. I have always enjoyed having my door open. that’s the challenge of working at home is that you're alone. Every place has it systems. you take what you need and don’t take what you don’t need.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

Typically I would say process, and that is what initially drew me in. But, I also find it very hard to let go of things that I make for myself. It is probably a reflection of the process.

What is your ideal creative activity?

Yoga is a really good time. It’s a time where I let go. Somebody else is telling me what to do and in a way I am not in charge. I really think that every single moment there is Something there. Even if you are just at the bus stop doing nothing there is still something there that you can take away from it. if you don’t take-in the moment then you are just going.

Which artists do you most admire?

It changes but I always resonate with performance and installation artists. I like things that are temporary and relevant to space. The short term nature of things sets up interesting responses.

What is your creative ambition?

I want to make what I am doing now and figure out how to change it. I want to change the pace and the scale. Right now I make things fast, small, and in multiples to make a large piece. I want to slow down the making -- I don’t know where that is going to take the work necessarily.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

I like making and I will just make as a default. I should think during that time and slow it down. You go to what you like to do. I need to say ‘this is the time for stretching a new muscle.’

How do you begin your day?

I try and have a period of time where I am not doing anything. I am not talking to anybody. Our home looks out at the bay when the sun is rising. The color change on the water is just amazing. And I am trying to do a little more listening, specifically to podcasts.

 

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

I don’t think I do. I really like doing things differently, not that I always take different routes. I used to be very into control but I really like change. You can’t stop it so instead of fighting it just know things can be fresh and fun. My goal is to embrace it and find ways to change something.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

I don’t seek it out. I enjoy it. I think a lot of times it comes out and it sounds good. That's a good creative activity but I don't know it always translates into anything. it can be forced.

“My door is always open. I am perfectly happy to have people stop by. You never know who you are going to meet are what’s going to happen.” If you should find your way up to the third floor at Maryland Hall feel free to peek into Elizabeth’s studio! Studio 310 B.

 

We are saddened to learn of the passing of Phyllis Avedon at the age of 90.  Phyllis was a long-time MD Hall Artist-in-Residence, a founding member and coordinator of our Drawing and Painting Co-ops and organizer of many trips to arts destinations around the region.  She was a vital part of our community for many years and will be missed.   To read more about Phyllis Avedon and her accomplished life please follow this link.

Purchase a Young Patron membership during the month of February and receive an  additional young patron membership free to share with a friend. Learn more about Young Patron memberships and join today.


 

Young Patron Happy Hour

 

Maryland Hall is hosting a free happy hour in the galleries on Thursday, February 23rd from 5-7 pm. This is an opportunity to view artwork, learn more about the Young Patrons, and enjoy wine from Great Frogs Winery. 

RSVP to the FREE Happy Hour Here. Those who RSVP in advance will be entered to win admission for 1 to the Sip and Paint with Kim Hovell on Thursday, March 2nd at Maryland Hall. 

 

Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts’ (MHCA) President and CEO Linnell Bowen has announced her retirement from MHCA effective June 30, 2017.    

Bowen will transition to a role with MHCA’s Capital Campaign--called The Campaign for Maryland Hall--a multi-year campaign to raise $18 million to modernize and expand Maryland Hall.

Maryland Hall’s Board has hired executive search firm Raffa (based in Washington, DC and Rockville) to assist in managing the transition and search process for a new President.  The search will be announced by the firm in mid to late February.  

Says Bowen of her many years at Maryland Hall and in the building:  “I loved Annapolis High School (my high school) and I loved teaching here in the 60’s. And I loved my past 21 years at the helm of Maryland Hall. Arts and education is my passion and we have accomplished great things together. The mission of Maryland Hall is so important and we look to the next CEO to continue the successes we’ve had. I thank all of our patrons for your past and on-going support of our mission and for all you’ve done to help make our organization the successful organization it is today!” 

“We have accomplished a lot in the past two decades,” she adds, “including restored theatre windows, new doors, turning a high school auditorium into an intimate concert hall, and last week, the groundbreaking for the first new construction on site since the building’s construction in 1932.  I am proud of all that we offer to the community through education, exhibits, and performances. We truly deliver Art for All!  I am happy to stay involved in the Capital Campaign but am ready to turn over the leadership of the organization to my successor and support whoever the Board selects for that position.” 

 

Read the article from the Capital Gazette: Maryland Hall president to retire after 21 years

Linnell Bowen sits in her office among some of her favorite pieces of local art and awards she has earned as president of Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.

Her eyes moving around the room, she settles on one award in particular: The Arts Council of Anne Arundel County Annie Award for Lifetime Achievement.

Bowen received the reward in 2011, 15 years after starting her tenure as Maryland Hall president in 1996. Lifetime achievement awards are often given to people who have completed their work, but Bowen continued on in her position.

Now that will be coming to an end.

(Follow this link to continue reading)

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