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Maryland Hall presents the world famous Comedy Pet Theater on Friday, March 20 at 7:30 pm. This family-oriented theatrical circus is a blend of unique physical comedy, starring Gregory Popovich and the extraordinary talents of his rescued performing pets. Tickets are $26 for Non-Members; $21 for Maryland Hall members and $17 for children. Click here to purchase tickets.

Internationally-acclaimed award winner, Gregory Popovich, is the producer and star of the show along with his entourage of 30 rescued furry four-legged performers. Popovich has won numerous juggling awards and is known as one of the top three best jugglers of the world. Currently, he holds the world record in a balancing/juggling feat in which he stands atop a nine-foot free standing ladder and juggles nine rings.

During the show, audiences will witness acts such as the Dog Classroom, the Amazing House-Cats, the Animal Train Station and so much more. Surprise appearances by more animal performers, including trained doves, parrots, goats and even a miniature horse named Diamond, along with acrobats, mimes, contortionists and jaw dropping juggling by Popovich.

Popovich is a lifelong advocate of animal rights. All pets that perform in Comedy Pet Theater are rescues from shelters — and serve as furry ambassadors for animals seeking homes. “When people see these amazing, healthy animals on stage and decide to adopt an animal from a shelter themselves, my main message has reached the audience,” says Popovich. Popovich is a master animal trainer who employs positive-reinforcement techniques in his training — coaching individual animals to perform tasks based on their natural habits. He has shared his expertise for raising, training and living harmoniously with pets in two books: “You CAN Train Your Cat: Secrets of a Master Cat Trainer,” and “Doggy Gone Good: A Master’s Guide to Teaching Manners, Tricks and Healthy Habits.”

Click the video below to see a preview of Gregory Popovich and his pets in action. 

I have chosen my Christmas Amaryllis to show the progress of creating a painting.  I have it set up in my studio and I have taped a large piece of paper and use blue tape to crop where I am going to paint.

 

I put out fresh paint on plates that serve as my palette, and lots of water that I replace often to keep colors clean and fresh. Next: I do a quick sketch of my subject to define some colors and composition.

 

I usually start painting on the paper with colors and do not start with a detailed pencil sketch. On the right is after two hours of painting. The painting is finished and I will show you how I keep adding to the flower.

 

As I continue I keep defining and adding detail to he painting.  

 

I have finished the painting or I should say I have stopped.  That is the key to water color, knowing when to stop.   I added a light background to surround the flower.  I look at my sketch and loose design with pen & ink. It  is more  the feeling I want to convey of this flower. I can add ink or strong pencil line that can be washed to create more of the a linear feeling.

Many artists are not satisfied with the progress of a piece of art.

My Amaryllis is gone,the petals have dropped.   I can start it again on a new piece of paper,  I will not use photos, but reference the painting and the sketch I have.  

I hear my muse speaking to my art soul "it is just a piece of paper".

 

For more information about Merla, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every Monday for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

 

The Maryland Hall community was very sad to learn of the death of Bonnie Roth Anderson this week.  Bonnie taught classes at Maryland Hall for more than 30 years and had been an Artist-in-Residence for 25 years, from 1983 through 2008.

Bonnie was an exceptional teacher who taught numerous painting classes for adults each semester at Maryland Hall.  Students clamored to register for her classes as soon as they were available and for many years her classes had waiting lists, a testament to her skill and talent as a teacher.  She created a warm and supportive atmosphere in her classes, providing students with a safe place to explore and hone their painting skills.  She had a wonderful sense of humor and sense of fun which she shared with all she met at Maryland Hall.  For more than 30 years she set a high standard for teaching that helped Maryland Hall develop the reputation for excellent artistic instruction that it enjoys today.  

As an artist, Bonnie was a well-known for her portraits and landscapes.  Her paintings hang in public and private collections throughout America and in countries as far away as Australia. Her portrait of former superintendent Admiral John Davidson is on permanent display at the U.S. Naval Academy and her portraits of J. Lynne Wood and John Cade are displayed at Anne Arundel Community College.  Her paintings have been featured in innumerable galleries and in public spaces.

As an arts patron and advocate, Bonnie was a founding member, former treasurer and president of the Maryland Society of Portrait Painters.  She was also a founding member and board member of the Mid-Atlantic Plein Air Painters Association. She received the prestigious 2002 Annie Award from the Anne Arundel Arts Council. 

Family and friends may visit on Sunday, February 22, 2015 from 1:00 pm -2:00 pm at Barranco & Sons, P.A. Severna Park Funeral Home, 495 Ritchie Hwy, in Severna Park, with a Memorial Service to begin at 2:00 pm, after the visitation. Interment will be private. - For more information, click here.

I have found painting plein air with artist friends is what I enjoy most. I am sad that I will no longer be able to paint with Bonnie Roth Anderson. We last painted a year ago in Bristol Rhode Island.   Diane Carey Thomson, Marion LeMoal, Bonnie and I stayed at the summer home of artist Janice Antinucci. Here is a painting and sketch in the area where we painted together.  At the end of the day Bonnie would critique our paintings.  She was a great teacher and we all  learned so much from her.  I also took her portrait class and hope to paint my grandchildren with the skills she taught me.  Such a loss for the art community.

Marshes (above) was an earlier Cape Cod painting that Bonnie purchased... the highest compliment is when another artist buys your painting.

Above are pictures of memorable places painted en plein air (L-R): Georgia O'Keeffe home in Abiquiu, Giverny, France and trees in Taos, New Mexico.

 

For more information about Merla, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

The Capital recently featured the upcoming exhibition Nature/Nurture: The Paintings of Father and Daughter by Peter Egeli and Lisa Egeli. 

Like father like … daughter?

Peter Egeli, 80, is a well-regarded painter and portrait artist. A son of famed portraitist Bjorn Egeli, a native of Norway, he grew up in a family where every one of his siblings picked up the paintbrush en route to becoming acclaimed artists.

His son Stuart Egeli took another path. A 1992 Naval Academy graduate, he had a 24-year career in the Navy.

His daughter Lisa, 48, has now followed in his paint-spattered footsteps, becoming a third-generation member of the Egeli artistic legacy.

She, too, is a portrait and landscape artist. Her portraits hang in institutions and in public and private collections. Her portfolio includes meticulously detailed portraits of gorillas and chimpanzees painted in their natural settings.

On March 2 through April 11, the father-and-daughter duo are exhibiting their landscapes, maritime scenes and wildlife studies in the Chaney Gallery at Maryland Hall, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. Their showcase is called "Nature/ Nurture: The Paintings of Father and Daughter."

This is the first time they have exhibited together since family members staged a show in Baltimore in 1985.

In the showcase will be about 50 of their works both large and small. Primarily oil paintings, the Egelis are incorporating several pastel sketches and watercolor paintings into the display.

Some were painted while the pair were outside, standing either side-by-side or back-to-back. Several were created near the house of her father and mother Elizabeth Stuart "Stu" Egeli in the St. Mary's County town of Drayden.

Click here to read the full article to learn more about the father/daughter duo and their exhibit which will be on display in the Chaney Gallery from March 2 - April 11. 

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