News

Over the weekend, members of a street artists group called Urban Walls Brazil took over the first floor hallway at Maryland Hall. They transformed the blank hallways into beautiful works of art. If you haven't seen their work yet, we highly recommend you stop by Maryland Hall to check it out. Below are some before, during and after photos.

Click here to see more photos of the murals.

 

About Urban Walls Brazil

Urban Walls Brazil is the brainchild of art lover, Roberta Pardo. Born out of a traveling exhibition that made its way to Washington D.C., NYC, Annapolis and Sao Paulo, Urban Walls Brazil has grown into an ongoing Urban Art project that has unlimited potential.

Through murals and workshops, Urban Walls Brazil creates an exchange between cultures and opens the market between the United States and Brazil. Roberta houses the Brazilan artists through her residency program, where they are able to interact with local artists and work on community art projects.

Native of Brazil with dual citizenship, Roberta Pardo has lived in Maryland for the last 13 years, She spent most of her youth traveling the world and can speak 6 languages. Prior to focusing on art, Roberta was an international horse rider and trainer, competing for her native country and in numerous international competitions. Roberta’s background is in Industrial Design and Fine Arts. Her education includes FAAP (Fundacao Armando Alvez Penteado) in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Her great passion is Street Art for its connection between art and environment. 

Website: www.urbanwallsbrazil.com

Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Matt Moore takes you on a tour of her studio in Studio 312A.

Testing out work for his exhibition Analogous​ on display in the Martino Gallery now.

 

Photo slide panel for his exhibition Analogous​.

 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Analogous is a series of site-specific works and photographic experiments that investigate the current state of photography. The works in this series make use of materials that have become increasingly obsolete in photographic practice, such as grey cards, instant film and obscure darkroom tools. By repurposing these objects, the project addresses photography’s past with reverence, while at the same time acknowledging its digital future. Also included in this project are two collaborative pieces with artist Todd Forsgren that delve into issues of art history education and the transition to digital archives in the arts.

I want to thank Maryland Hall and Sigrid Trumpy in particular for having the courage to put up shows they know are not going to sell work.  There are a plethora of private galleries in Annapolis that reinforce the cities’ reputation for having an un-evolved art scene.  What I have discovered in Annapolis is a small but sophisticated audience of people that crave more engaging art.  As an art center and not a private gallery, Maryland Hall has a duty to put up more challenging art exhibitions and thankfully they are rising to that challenge more and more of late.  I also think it is critical for artists in the community to fight the urge to make artwork that they think will sell in Annapolis.  It would be impossible to hold galleries in this town to higher standards if the artists themselves are feeding them derivative art.  Monet did a great job of being Monet all by himself.  And his art was cutting edge at the time he made it.  I think we owe it to ourselves, as a community, to foster the same type of cutting edge spirit for ourselves!

-Matthew Moore

 
Art history slides from AACC.
 
​Art History Slides repurposed for Matt's show Analogous.
 
Art History Slides that were saved by Matt Moore for his latest show.
 
Matt Moore in his studio at Maryland Hall.
 
Matt Working on 'Rose Window' for his show 'Analogous' at Maryland Hall.
 
Final Product of Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' in their show 'Analogous'​.
 
Light trickling thorugh Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' at Maryland Hall's Martino Gallery.
 
'Rose Window' giving the Martino Gallery a stained glass effect on the floor.
 
 
 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Put Paint on Canvas

My drawing teacher in college was rather eccentric and spent a large part of every class spouting advice to his students.  About half of that advice was about art and the rest concerned our life choices as budding adults. Often our ears would be bleeding whilst we struggled to focus on and translate the perfect curve of our inner nostrils during portraiture. In retrospect, I think he enjoyed watching the confusion on our faces as we tried to digest his seemingly sage-like, nonsensical words of wisdom. Not much of what I learned in college has been retained even these 10 years later. One lesson, however, I recall everyday and owe to that strange teacher; he told us to “put mark on paper.” By these four words, he simply meant for us to work, whether we wanted or not. We were pushed to be productive no matter what may try to forestall us: lack of inspiration, stress, tiredness, lack of direction, lack of confidence. . .  The list of distractions could go on forever. His point, if I may presume to expand upon it, is that we have a certain amount of time to do the things we really want to do and an endless queue of things we could be doing instead. 

I do something creative every day. I put brush to canvas, pencil to paper, or torch to metal when I’m feeling good about my direction or when I’m completely lost. It’s easy when I’m feeling inspired and downright painful when I’m not motivated. When I’m done, I’m either further along on my work or I’m dead-sure that my path lies in the opposite direction of what I just completed. Working every day makes failure easier to accept and overcome, and it helps keep me connected to my work and confident about my abilities. There is nothing more intimidating to an artist than a set of tools that have gathered dust from neglect. 

Have I made mistakes with this philosophy? So many! Have I ruined paintings? Not sure. I’ve certainly become familiar with the words “artwork in crisis.” For me, the process is the best part of the excursion and the finished piece is the product, the legacy if you will, of the effort. My best advice for myself and for anyone at all is to make a mark, everyday.          -Kate Osmond

Progression photos of Kate Osmond's work

Studio Tour with AIR Kate Osmond

 

Left to right:  Ariel views of her work; different bodies of work.

    

Below left to right:  Finished work; Kate's studio
     

Bottom left to right:  works in progress; close up of Osmond's Waterfront work
    

 

An Interview with Kate Osmond

What are the primary materials that you use?  

For painting I typically do large-scale paintings on canvas and I have been starting to incorporate the use of 24 karat gold leaf. For my sculpture works I use copper and steel welding and brazing. I have to work from home for my sculptural work because it is a fire hazard here. 

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

The work I most wish I had made is probably Andrew Wyeth’s Christina’s World because of his use of perspective. The viewer is both looking down on this woman and is also directly next to her. The feeling of isolation the woman brings fascinates me.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

The process. I am only concerned about the process. And, I never know when a work is finished! 

What is your ideal creative activity?

That would probably be climbing around construction sites.

Which artists do you most admire?

J.M.W. Turner and Andrew Wyeth are two of my favorite painters.

What is your creative ambition?

A creative ambition of mine…. Well, I would love to one day create a giant free children’s museum.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

I travel a lot with my family. I guess that’s a pattern! There is also a lot of pattern repetition in my sculptural work.

 

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR).
Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. 
Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.
Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts (MHCA) has installed a dual electric car charging station for electric car visitors.  Patrons visiting Maryland Hall for concerts, classes, gallery visits, meetings and community events can plug-in their cars at any time (for free) as the charging station is operational 24/7. 
 
The charging unit is located in the north parking lot behind Maryland Hall. EV drivers can charge quickly without having to sign up for a membership. In addition, PlugShare, the most widely used smart phone application, will allow EV drivers to charge using this popular app without restriction.
 
The SemaConnect charger has been installed as part of the on-going five-year $18 million Capital Campaign to modernize and expand Maryland Hall.  This charging station capability provides an important opportunity to add an environmentally green capability as part of the renewal of this Maryland Historical Trust (circa 1932) former high school. The installation and start-up of this project was funded by capital campaign contributions from environmentally conscience donors.  The Maryland Energy Administration also provided financial support under the Electric Vehicle Supply Equipment Rebate Program.

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