Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Lindsay Pichaske takes you on a tour of her studio.

I have a wall of tools and a wall of inspirational images. These tools are ones I use frequently, and I love having them out and visible, do I know where everything is. The images are of other artists' work, reference animal images, and images of interesting objects and textures that I've photographed.

I usually begin a piece by doing a quick, large scale drawing. These are examples of some previous pieces.

I keep a collection of natural found objects in my windowsill. These are my 'natural history museum' in the studio. They are objects I use as reference, and as textural inspiration in my work.

I also keep texture test tiles around my studio for reference for specific materials. Here I have an example of pinecone 'petals'.

I typically start each piece by making a quick maquette (small model). This quick study helps me work out the pose, gesture and proportions before starting on the larger piece.

 

For more information about Lindsay, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

 

Interview conducted by Gallery Director Sigrid Trumpy.

So let's start with the question about your experience at Art Basel Miami, the recent Art Fair you attended.
 
So there are a few different layers to that question. First of all I’d never been, so the experience of seeing that much blue chip art all in one space was pretty remarkable. I saw several pieces of artwork that I had only ever admired on the internet or in magazines. It was fun seeing this high caliber of work outside of the museum context and in a commercial setting. In some ways it made the artwork  a lot more intimate and accessible. 
   
This was also my first experience showing at an art fair there (Scope). It was wonderful exposure and was the most gorgeous place I’ve ever shown work in.  It was exciting to see my piece in that context, amidst the work of so many other artists and galleries.

So what are the primary materials that you use?

To sculpt the pieces I use low-fire clay (terra-cotta) and I fire them once in electric or gas kilns. I’ve been using the kilns here, which is very convenient. I fire to 1945° F, which means that the clay is almost vitrified, but hasn’t gotten so hot that it risks shrinkage or cracking. Clay is such a natural material to build figures out of because it's so skin-like and animate. Working with clay is kind of like working with another living creature. 

The second part of my process involves creating these skin-like second coats for the pieces. Materials that I have used in the past are string that wraps around the animal’s body to articulate the musculature, sequins, sticks, and feathers. I am interested in mimicking the muscle patterns but also in these materials becoming surreal fur or hair across the animal’s body.

You mentioned that you relate to the clay as a material but then you cover it so you lose the feel of the clay. How would you describe that transition?

I love the clay when it's wet and feels alive. When it's fired it dies for me and feels very sterile. The act of covering it with another material that I can get to know really intimately makes it slowly come back to life. 

I love the process because I feel that I’m bringing an unknown creature into existence and getting to know a new being (although I realize they are just made objects). When I’m sculpting it’s as though I’m creating a new, hybrid creature. The act of covering it’s body is a process that is almost opposite to the sculpting. It’s not as physical, but rather meditative and introspective. 

So talk about your earliest memory of art and how that has affected you now?

When I was in early elementary school my mom was in architecture school and I was her model assistant.  I would cut tiny trees to specific sizes and glue tiny pieces of wood for her models. I have the strong memory of being about seven and loving working in the studio with all these exuberant young people and just loving that tedious process. It wasn't even a visual memory of art, but rather it was the physical act of doing it that I fell in love with. 

Which artist do you most admire and are role models?

Kiki Smith and Louise Bourgeois--both for their prolific careers and work ethic. Kiki Smith for her subject matter. Her sculptures, which are full of dark folklore and hybrid creatures really resonate with me. Her piece, Born, for instance, depicts a female figure being born of deer, is something I look to again and again. 

Louis Bourgeois for some of the reasons we just talked about with Kiki Smith, and the fact that she continued to make deeply personal yet potent sculptural work into her 100's! She was making figurative work at a time and it wasn't very popular to be doing so. Further, her work has such emotional, personal, and psychological power. 

For more information about Lindsay, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

 

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every Monday for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts (MHCA) will host the 10th Annual All That Art exhibition (from April 20-May 1) and auction fundraising event on May 1 from 6-9 pm in MHCA’s galleries.  Proceeds from All That Art benefit Maryland Hall’s visual arts program and the participating artists; live and silent auction sales are split equally between the artist and Maryland Hall. 

Since 2006, All That Art has raised more than $400,000 in support of artists and Maryland Hall.  The event has grown in size and scope and today attracts committed art buyers who are passionate about purchasing art and supporting Maryland Hall.  Thanks to artists submitting a variety of high-quality artwork and the work of auctioneer Brenda Anderson, who connects the audience to the artwork and artists, many pieces sell over retail value during the auctions. 

For All That Art 2015, artists will be juried into the event or invited.  Juried artists will come from an open selection process where all artists are invited to submit work to be considered by the All That Art jury.  A small group of artists will participate in All That Art by invitation.  

Work in all media are acceptable including but not limited to: drawing, painting, sculpture, jewelry, pottery, mixed media and photography.  Click here for more information and to submit your work. The deadline to submit your work is January 9.

Discipline: 
Visual Arts
E-mail: 

Biography

Ric Conn has been a student of nature and ornithology most of his life, and while his professional career as an artist seemingly goes in two different directions—wildlife and the human figure—Ric believes that they are very much related.

“Just as all vertebrates have a common structure, I believe that all animals have a distinct personality. It is certainly true with man and the rest of the animal kingdom is no exception.” My figurative and wildlife paintings focus on the personalities of the individuals and it is this and the attitude of the subject that give my paintings life.”

Ric’s artistic career began at age 5 with his first freehand drawings. Intending to draw an apple he placed on the table, coincidentally in the sunlight, he became fascinated with light and shadow. When he next used his arm as a model—his passion for figurative art began

His awards include the “Face of Queen Anne’s County” medal for one of his oil paintings, first, second and third place awards, numerous Honorable Mention awards, an Award of Merit and Best in Show.

Ric has had solo and group shows in Baltimore, Columbia, Annapolis, Frederick, Towson, Bethesda, Stevensville and Centreville, MD, Washington, D.C., Illinois, and New York City. He has paintings in private collections in several states and Australia.

Ric also teaches painting birds classes in Queen Anne’s County middle schools, Queen Anne’s County Arts Council, summer camps and private lessons in his studio. Ric has given portrait drawing demonstrations at the Kent Island Federation of Arts, as well as bird painting and anatomy drawing workshops for summer kid’s camps at the Kent Island Federation of Arts and the Chesapeake Bay Environmental Center.

Ric has travelled extensively up and down the Eastern seaboard, across the country and to several Caribbean Islands to observe, record and paint the wildlife he encounters.

In addition to art organizations Ric belongs to several wildlife, and nature organizations, not only to advance his knowledge of wildlife, but to help the conservation and protection efforts for our wildlife, natural world and companion animals.

Ric Conn was born in 1951 in Baltimore, Maryland and studied at the Corcoran College of Art in Washington, D.C. and the Maryland Institute College of Art. He currently lives and works on Kent Island, just off the Eastern Shore of Maryland.

Maryland Hall President, Linnell Bowen, sat down with Comcast Newsmakers' Elena Russo to discuss the first phase of renovations and future renovations. Click the video below to watch the full interview.
 

Give the gift of the arts through a Maryland Hall Gift Certificate! 

Give the gift of the arts during the holiday season, as a birthday gift or any time during the year.  Maryland Hall Gift Certificates can be purchased for any amount you choose.

Gift Certificates can be used toward:

  • Maryland Hall classes
  • Art from the galleries
  • Memberships
  • Maryland Hall special events
  • Tickets to performances sold by Maryland Hall's Box Office (including performances by Annapolis Chorale, Opera, Ballet Theatre of Maryland and select Symphony performances)
 
The recipient can redeem the gift certificate in person in the Box Office at Maryland Hall (M-F, 9 am to 5 pm) or can use it to make purchases on the Maryland Hall web site (for the items listed above).   
 

To purchase a gift certificate follow these two easy steps:

1.  Click here to make your gift certificate purchase.   You will receive a confirmation email with a gift certificate account number and expiration date and a link to download a Gift Certificate Form suitable for giving as a gift (or you may download the form here). 

2.  Print your Gift Certificate Form and include the 9-digit account number and expiration date on the Form and you are ready to give your gift! 

You may also purchase a gift certificate by calling Maryland Hall at 410-263-5544, ext. 10 , M-F, 9 am to 5 pm.  

 

  

Buy a Gift Certificate!

Give the gift of the arts this holiday season with a Maryland Hall gift certificate.  You can purchase a gift certificate on-line or order one using the form below.  Gift certificates can be for any amount and can be used toward any Maryland Hall class, performance (including Opera, Chorale or Ballet Theatre of Maryland performance), artwork, membership or special event.

When you complete your transaction, you will receive an email that can printed and given as a gift.  

 

 

 

 

 

Donna Anderson, Maryland Hall VP of Marketing & Development, recently sat down with Comcast's Elena Russo to talk about upcoming performances at Maryland Hall. To watch the complete interview, click on the video below.

All you need is ten or more people to enjoy a performance to receive a reduced ticket price for a group.  You don’t need to be an official organization or club to qualify.  Just find ten friends, relatives or co-workers and you can receive discounts on tickets for selected performances and save money on ticket fees.  Groups pay a flat $7 fee for a group ticket order.

To order group tickets, please come in or call the Box Office between noon and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, at 410-280-5640 or 410-263-5544, press 0.  You must pay for your order with a single credit card or a check at the time of reservation.  Email the box office with questions:  boxoffice@mdhallarts.org

 

The following Maryland Hall performances have group ticket prices:

Spooky Silents:  A Silent Film Halloween with the Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra: Saturday, November 1, 7:30 pm.  Group price:  $13/person.

Comedy Pet Theatre: Friday, March 20, 7:30 pm. Group price: $12/person.

The following Ballet Theatre of Maryland performances have group ticket prices:

A Mid Summer Night's Dream: Friday, October 24, 7:30 pm; Saturday, October 25, 7 pm; and Sunday, October 26, 2 pm.  Group price: $42.30/person (section A); $36/person (section B)

The Nutcracker: Saturday, December 13, 7 pm; Sunday, December 14, 1 and 4:30 pm; Saturday, December 20, 7 pm; Sunday, December 21, 1 and 4:30 pm.  Group price:  $42.30/person.

Cinderella: Friday, February 20, 7:30 pm; Saturday, February 21, 7 pm; Sunday, February 22, 2 pm.  Group price:  $42.30/person.

Innovations 2015: Friday, April 17, 7:30 pm; Saturday, April 18, 7 pm; Sunday, April 19, 2 pm.  Group price:  $42.30/person (section A); $36/person (section B)

On Sunday, September 28, Maryland Hall unveiled the first phase of our renovated theatre at a presentation and performance attended by donors, members and community leaders.  The evening included performances by the Annapolis Chorale and musicians and dancers from the Annapolis Opera, Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Theatre of Maryland and Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra.  

As the 2014-15 fall performing arts season unfolds, audiences will find new, comfortable seats with more legroom, parterre seating (box-style) for a unique perspective, improved acoustics and lighting, and a greater floor incline for better sight lines to the stage.  Additional stage elements – an orchestra pit, stage extension and stage risers – showcase performers in new and exciting ways. The eight majestic windows have been beautifully restored and have operable acoustic shutters to perhaps allow sunlight into the theatre...for the first time in decades.

 
 
The theatre before the summer 2014 renovation. 
 
The theatre after the summer 2014 renovation.
 
 

Video created by videographer Julien Jacques
 
 

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