Discipline: 
Meditation
E-mail: 

"Fitness has become a hobby that is enjoyable to me. Once fit, I learned that varied activities can be pursued.  My goal has become to limit gym time by starting to walk, cycle, and stretch to enhance my ability to perform functional activities appropriate to my age level.  Twice a week for cardio and strength training, mindfulness, and varied activities is my recipe for wellness."

Over the past two decades, Craig has evolved his workout routine into a lifestyle and future career. Now a certified fitness trainer and wellness coach since 2011, Craig is on a path to a new career in wellness training.  Craig just taught a class for the 2015-2016 school year at the Maryland Hall for Creative Arts and will be teaching three workshops this year.  His class, The Art of Meditation, focuses on relaxation, visualization, and meditation.

The Art of Meditation workshops at MHCA focus on the single-pointed focus of mindfulness. Each class is organized to create the ability of the student to practice relaxation exercises of deep breathing and visualization. From the beginning of the three, two-hour workshops, the ability to understand the art of meditation in several distinctive ways is practiced as a group.

The path to mindfulness requires patience and practice. Meditation practice is taught in the form of visualization of the mantra and focus on the breath in a relaxed state. To prepare for meditation is to accept the single-pointed focus and use the tools of several modes of meditation practice. Some of the forms covered include pranayama breathing, Zen visualizations, OM mantra meditation, walking meditations, candle gazing meditation, and the Hands of Light meditation.

Ralph Crosby, well-known local businessman, will discuss his new book, "Memories of a Main Street Boy:  Growing up in America's Ancient City," on Thursday, December 15 at 6:30 pm at Maryland Hall.  The talk is free and open to the public and will take place in Room 308.  The book will be for sale at the event with proceeds from sales that night going to Maryland Hall.  

A native Annapolitan and 1952 Annapolis High School graduate, Mr. Crosby grew up in an apartment on Main Street. His book tells the story of his growing up during one of the most disruptive, yet most dynamic, eras in our nation’s history – from the end of the Great Depression, through World War II to the Cold War – and how that impacted his generation on Main Streets across America.

Throughout the book, Mr. Crosby weaves in historic Colonial references to the places, people and events that shaped early Annapolis. He also talks about his days at Annapolis High School, now Maryland Hall, which makes the venue for the December 15 event particularly appropriate.

Mr. Crosby’s book can be purchased on December 15, in advance on Amazon.com or at Back Creek Books or Annapolis Bookstore in downtown Annapolis.   

Mr. Crosby is founder and chairman of Crosby Marketing Communications, a nationally recognized public relations/advertising firm located in Annapolis. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and a former journalist who has also published two other books.

 

 

  

An Interview with Emily Welsh

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I am taking ideas and themes from older projects and working them into new projects while I am here. I went to school for printmaking. I liked intaglio on copper the best. They had a brand new studio where I went to school and they were just getting a bunch of non-toxic things. My apartment is small and I wanted to get back into printmaking. I have been elbows deep in work which lent me to be in the music industry and night-life.

I was doing a lot of sketches in bars and with musicians. I had this idea to create the sketches into prints and develop them into a more finished project. Because I have been so heavily involved in work I have not been able to express myself the way I used to so having my studio at Maryland Hall has been great.

What are the primary materials that you use?  

Pen and watercolor for the initial sketches I have been doing. I carry a small cheap ten color watercolor kit. For the prints I use copper plates and ink - typically black and white. I might experiment with color this go around though.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

Probably my art teacher from middle school. It was around Easter time and I came home with these really intricate drawings of “Eggtown” and I did everything cars, buildings, etc. In elementary school art was prominent. In Middle school, the curriculum changed and for some reason art was lost somewhere.  I was more science oriented. In highschool I went back to taking art classes.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

Any of Jeff Koons balloon animal sculptures mainly because I wish the large scale is something I could do. I just don’t have the means to really do that. I want to create a mechanical menagerie and have these large scale mechanical animals. They would probably be paper mache but I will refine the technique from my previous paper mache endeavors.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?

It has been great being here. I live with two other people and they have  turned our kitchen table into a craft center.For me, it’s really just creating a mess and not cleaning it up. So, it has been really nice to have a studio where I come back to everything where I left it. I was an AIR in the past as well and I came into that residency with no expectations. It both was and wasn’t what I was thinking.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

I think if i don’t like the process then I won’t like the result. [In printmaking] you have to prepare the plate in such a way first or the rest of the system won’t work. If you miss a step the acid won’t set or the ink won’t dry, and so on. I become somewhat obsessed with the process. I can tell going to a bar if the process is going to work based on who is there, what music it is, what bar I’m at, etc.

What is your ideal creative activity?

Driving. I had the grand scheme of finding a studio space and etching these drawings when I was on a really long drive. It has happened multiple times - on the jersey turnpike when I have been by myself long enough that my mind starts turning and I want to pull over and start writing all these things down.

Which artists do you most admire?

I have been heavily influenced by illustrators. My grandmother had the older version of the old Wizard of Oz stories. Some are full color illustrations and some are just black and white. the whole fantastical themes stuck with me.

My favorite artists are

Quentin Blake - Roaldl Dahl Books

Hilary Knight - Elouise

W.W. Denslow - Wizard of Oz

Edward Gorey -  The Gashlycrumb Tinies

What is something you are proud of that you have created in the past?

The Electric Elephant is a book that my grandfather wrote. It was based on another story with the same title. He wrote 50 pages filled with stories and they always incorporated me and my 3 cousins, Kate, Sam, and Grace on an adventure. I illustrated the whole book.

Who are some of your role models?

Outside of my parents it would be some of the people I worked with previously. I worked at Rams Head and met a lot of really incredible tour managers. A lot of the female tour managers were really influential in a really man-dominated industry.

 

What is your creative ambition?

A mechanical menagerie based off of my animal prints is definitely something to work towards.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

Space and size. When I was working on the elephant the last time I was here, I wanted to do an art installation kind of art walk. At the time there were a lot of unfortunate empty storefront spaces in Historic Annapolis. I would like to use those spaces at some point and create random areas for art installations. It would include a pop-up art walk.

How do you begin your day?

Currently just setting a loose plan for the day. Trying to get into a routine.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

Circles are definitely repetitive in my art. If you look through any of my sketchbooks you will see them everywhere.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

Outside of doing these portraits of people at bars there was not a lot of dialog like that at work. But, I do rely on a conversation to further what I am doing. I like it to be someone who is far away from the process and from me. Sometimes it takes someone, who has no idea about my work, that asks me a question that sparks an answer or another way to see or do things.

Ignite Annapolis #2 Announced: Call for Presentations

International Phenomenon returns to Annapolis

5 Minutes, 20 slides. What would you say to Annapolis? Enlighten us, but make it quick.

Organizers Kris Valerio Shock, Liz Thibodeau, Kathleen Booth and Gavin Buckley are excited to announce the second Ignite Annapolis event is scheduled to take place from 7:00-9:00pm on Wednesday, November 30th at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts. 

If you had five minutes on stage, what would you say to Annapolis? What if you only got 20 slides and they rotated automatically after 15 seconds? Following an initial Ignite Annapolis event in 2009 and subsequent hugely successful Ignite events in Baltimore and Howard County, on November 30th at 7 pm, 16 artists, technologists, entrepreneurs, and philosophers will answer this challenge at Ignite Annapolis #2. The event will be held at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, at 801 Chase Street, Annapolis, MD. 

More Information

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OctobARTfest Vendor

OctobARTfest 
Saturday, October 29, 2016 | 12 - 4 pm

Annapolis Young Artist Program (AYAP) Interview with Natalie Spehar (NS) - interviewed by Emily Kohlenstein (EK)

EK - Let’s start by talking about your background...Where you grew up and how you got started playing music.

NS - I grew up in Northeast Ohio and spent much time in Cleveland studying music and watching The Cleveland Orchestra. I had a pretty eclectic musical upbringing … In addition to other full-time work, my dad is an accordion player and my mom is a singer. Growing up, I spent a lot of time in my uncle’s recording studio as well, listening to rock and metal bands I probably wouldn't have heard of otherwise, especially at a young age. At age four I started classical piano lessons and aural skills class. When I was ten, the high school orchestra came to play for my elementary school class and I immediately fell in love with the cello. I went home that day and told my mom that’s what I wanted to play. She rented me a cello that week, and things pretty much took off from there.

I think because I already had a lot of musical experience when I picked up the cello and could read music, I learned quickly and was able to start recording a couple years into my studies. My uncle would rope me into projects in his studio and also threw me into a contemporary folk band, where I learned how to improvise. I continued to pursue formal classical training as well.

EK - Do you write your own music now, after all of that?

NS - I have composed a few songs and arranged many projects. Usually, though, I find myself improvising in a studio setting or interpreting other composers’ repertoire.

 

EK - Was there ever a time where you thought 'I don't know if music is exactly what I want to pursue as a lasting career?'

NS - Yes --  I have always loved medicine and still like to read medical journals and articles. I know a lot of other musicians have those shared interests... there are actually a few amateur adult orchestras made up of doctors! Many of the kids I grew up with did take a medical career route. I knew I couldn’t live without music being my focus, though, and decided after my sophomore year of high school to pursue it full time.

EK - That brings us to AYAP... how did that come into the mix of being a musician? Did you always know you wanted to work with kids?

NS - I think what draws me so much to live instrumental performance is the intense amount of communication required, and that it most often must happen without using words. With words out of the way, you must physically move more and create with great intent and openness in order to achieve an experience that draws other people in. You also must be open to what your other collaborators are sending your way, and be able to sit back, listen and respond meaningfully with your instrument.  It is always a challenge - and a reward - to connect with other people on that level and it is an excellent exercise in being an effective communicator and leader.

Those experiences shape the way that I listen to and connect with people in general, including kids. In highschool, I formed a volunteer quartet that would play at libraries and present free children’s shows. Since then, I have regularly pursued that kind of teaching and outreach work with young audiences and it over time inspired the idea for AYAP. When I moved to Annapolis and it came time for me to build a private cello studio here, I wanted to create something that was a well-rounded experience -- that introduced my current students not only to great musical repertoire but also to what I think is the overall most important part of being a musician: the joy of connecting with other people.

EK - One of the obvious objectives of AYAP students is performance skill but the other is civic leadership. One does not always see that in a young audience outreach environment. Why did you decide to include that in your curriculum?

NS - I participated in an Arts Leadership Program during my undergrad studies at Eastman School of Music and was exposed to every aspect of what was going to be vital in a professional performance career. I was so thankful for that training because I learned basics of grant writing and took accounting classes on my own, which are both skills I use weekly in running my own program. At ESM, we were also mentored as performance majors by the Ying quartet, who worked with us to develop outreach programs for local elementary schools and assisted living centers. They pushed us to be active collaborators out in the community and that shaped my professional life so much and influenced the way I interact with other people in general. I figured, why not start this training with even younger musicians! It is invaluable information that makes the experience of sharing music that much more rewarding.

As a result of that training, I also discovered that my passion for music could be a force that I use to address other social and community needs -- outside of the music world. For example, my outreach work with music at Maryland Hall has now developed into weekly, free music programming that serves at-risk youth in the area as well as public school students being mentored by our local juvenile justice system. In these situations, music is far more than a fun group activity -- it is teaching collaborative abilities, career skills and leadership concepts that will benefit students in any eventual professional setting. Several of the AYAP students have volunteered to coach these beginning music classes at Maryland Hall and have also taken initiative to create similar, small-group outreach initiatives in the community.

 

EK - Can you explain the new relationship between AYAP and Maryland Hall?

NS - To now have access to such inspiring facilities [at Maryland Hall] and an entirely new audience of people in Annapolis is wonderful and has greatly expanded the opportunities for our AYAP students. Over the years, we have been able to host phenomenal performers from across the country including local musicians from the National Symphony Orchestra, Baltimore Symphony, and Annapolis Symphony. With Maryland Hall being an important intersection of community arts organizations, our circle continues to expand and we are grateful for that! Maryland Hall is the ideal educational environment for AYAP’s activities and we feel privileged to now be officially operating as a part of Maryland Hall’s outreach program.

EK - Do you choose what events the kids should volunteer for?

NS - What draws a lot of students to the program is our initiative called AYAP Reach, which is a student-led effort to serve the community through volunteer musical work. AYAP faculty serve as mentors for the initiative, but the participating students are the ones tackling the creative as well as administrative responsibilities for most local performances that they present.

I’ve found that when students come in the door and are expected to collaborate at a professional level, something exciting happens -- the kids take pride in their roles and tend to go above and beyond what we expected, creating extra-innovative aspects of their art and new opportunities for their peers. I can facilitate those opportunities and mentor along the way, but do not assign students to specific activities. I simply include those that find the project meaningful and are motivated to help.

EK - Is the program currently open to members of Maryland Hall?

NS - It is open to all young musicians in our community, ages 12-18. AYAP hosts events year-round at Maryland Hall, providing a workshop and masterclass series during the academic year and a Summer String Institute in August, both of which can be registered for at www.marylandhall.org.

AYAP Reach functions year-round in a club format and new members are always welcome! The group meets on the first Saturday of each month for a formal student meeting and then performs and volunteers at local community events throughout the month. For more information about AYAP Reach, please feel free to inquire via email at info@annapolisyap.com.

EK - Can you talk about the Urban Initiative?

NS - A couple of years ago, AYAP started a collaboration with a Capitol Heights, Maryland branch of a national non-profit organization called Urban Initiatives. I was deeply impressed by their effective programming for local citizens in need, which included nutrition information class, summer camp, and a GED class for parents. AYAP teamed up with them to create a music addition to that programming, offering free string mini-camps with local children [in Capital Heights]. During a mini-camp, the kids come for 2 hours every day after school. Some have never played an instrument before so it is very fun and interesting for them. After two weeks, we perform a community concert in which they present individual solos learned as well as a group orchestra piece. It is such an awesome experience for all involved and we look forward to collaborating again soon!

EK - Is there a way people can donate to the program?

NS - Absolutely. We are thrilled to accept instrument donations or funding toward the maintenance of the instruments that we do own  -- we currently have several violins, guitars and a piano and use them daily.  Financial support of our Outreach Program at Maryland Hall in general is of course always appreciated and used to create important opportunities for youth in our community.  Thank you for your continued support!

For further information on funding opportunities and the meaningful influence that has on our outreach programming, please feel free to contact nspehar@mdhallarts.org.

 

 

 

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Music Together Chesapeake teachers

Christine Brimhall graduated from the Hartt School of Music (University of Hartford) with a Bachelors degree in both flute performance and music education. She continued her flute studies at Yale University, receiving her Master of Music in Flute Performance. Christine taught instrumental music in Prince George's County, Maryland for six years. As a music educator, she values the importance of early childhood music education and embraces family music making. Christine has participated in Music Together programs with her two daughters and started teaching Music Together in Fall 2011.  In July 2013 she completed a three-day refresher training, and earned her Music Together Certification I in July of 2014. 

Mandy Stinchcomb has a Bachelor's degree in Theatre from Goucher College in Baltimore. She began singing in choral groups over 17 years ago, and has had a love of music ever since. Mandy  has been participating in Music Together with her children since 2004, and has greatly enjoyed sharing music with her three children through the program. She completed her teacher training in the summer of 2008, and has been teaching family classes since the fall of that year.  Mandy has also taught Music Together In-school in Pasadena, MD. 

Art class Instructors

Holly Rosario was born in rural upstate New York, and spent her childhood exploring its forested terrain. Introverted and aesthetically curious by nature, Holly was interested in art from a young age. In 2007 she moved to Baltimore to attend the Maryland Institute College of Art where she pursued her Bachelors of Fine Arts in conjunction with a Master of Arts in Teaching. While at MICA, she developed an interest in watercolor, inks, paper cuts, and ceramics as well as a passion for art history.  As an artist, Rosario’s papercut works and watercolors are inspired by a love of nature on its most minuscule levels, and explore the role of pattern and repetition in the processes of growth and decay.  Rosario spent three years as an Elementary Art Teacher with Baltimore County Public Schools and is excited to continue her teaching at Maryland Hall.  She sees her pursuits as artist and educator as inseparably intertwined, and hopes to facilitate transformative learning by sharing her passion for the visual world.  She will be teaching visual arts classes for children.  

 

 

Video Above: Participants of AYAP's Summer String Institue 2016 perform an excerpt of
 Martinu's Serenade No. 2 for fellow students in a masterclass setting.

 

Young artists

As frequent visitors to Annapolis, we have been privileged to attend several of the area's numerous cultural events.

On a recent night at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts, the concert of the Annapolis Young Artists Program was one of the finest and most inspirational.

It was truly amazing to hear and to watch the professionalism of these young performers as they presented their summer string concert of various chamber and orchestral pieces under the excellent direction of Zack Stachowski, the conductor.

The newest addition to the program, the delightful junior artists ages 8 to 12, also performed some Beethoven and Handel.

If you get the opportunity to hear these students sometime, please do and bring your children and grandchildren who just might be inspired as well. What a great opportunity to learn leadership skills, team building and communication while expressing talent through the beauty of music.

The program was started in the basement of a church in Cape St. Claire. Founder Natalie Spehar deserves kudos for her vision for young musicians.

Bravo to all who made this event happen -- the staff, the students and Maryland Hall, for opening its doors for this event.

JIM and PAT YOST

Northampton, Pennsylvania

Original Story published in Capital Gazette Letters 

Check out our Vimeo page for more Maryland Hall videos!

Every day we see examples how Maryland Hall and our creative programs impact lives.  We are delighted to share the stories of two women whose careers and lives were recently changed through Maryland Hall. 

New Experiences Lead to A New Career

This spring, Nancy Politsch (pictured:  Nancy, left with Amy Crain) dramatically changed her life. And Maryland Hall played a large role in that change.

Nancy first got involved with Maryland Hall in 2012 through our annual art auction, All That Art.  As Senior Vice president of Wells Fargo, Nancy facilitated the bank’s role as a corporate sponsor of the event.  In 2013, at the suggestion of MHCA Board member Amy Crain, Nancy joined the All That Art Advisory Committee, which helps plan and execute this annual fundraising event.   And in 2014 Nancy became chair of the Action Committee, a role she repeated in 2015 and 2016.  “Her leadership, commitment and attention to detail helped the auction raise nearly $90,000 each year for Maryland Hall,” says Donna Anderson, MHCA’s VP of Marketing and Development.  "She brought great new ideas and helped recruit new artists, sponsors and attendees."  Nancy joined the Maryland Hall Board in 2014 and became Maryland Hall's Treasurer. 

During this time, Nancy also began taking fused glass classes at Maryland Hall.  “I took one class and I was hooked," she says.  A lifelong photographer who had published two books of photographs, Nancy fell in love with fused glass as an art form.  She became so interested in the craft, she bought a personal kiln and glass fusing equipment so she could create fused glass pieces at home.  “Every night after work, my kitchen became a de facto glass studio," she says. 

In late 2015, Nancy heard from a friend that a position was open at the Lighthouse Art Center in Jupiter, Florida.  She applied for the position and was hired this spring as the Center’s Executive Director; overseeing this non-profit organization’s museum gallery and school of art.  On May 1, Nancy and her husband moved from Maryland to Florida and Nancy started her new career. 

“I feel like the artistic experiences and leadership opportunities I had through Maryland Hall came together at the exact right time for me to make this huge life change,” says Nancy. "While my finance and 38 - year banking background was helpful, it is my experiences through Maryland Hall as a Board and Committee member and as an art student that really helped me understand how a nonprofit arts center operates.  Without the expertise I gained through Maryland Hall, I would not have felt confident to make this drastic life and career change."

An Email...A Class...And A New Career As An Artist

Janey Harrington had always been interested in art and had been painting as a hobby for many years.  She had participated in many activities at Maryland Hall in the past--performances, exhibits and classes for her kids.  But with a career and children to raise she was just too busy to invest in an arts class for herself.  Then one day she received a Maryland Hall email about a silk painting workshop we were offering.  "I was so excited because it was what I had always wanted to learn," she says. 

She enrolled in the class advertised in the email and several others afterward.  "The classes I have taken at Maryland Hall have contributed greatly not only to my technical development as an artist, they have has also helped with my personal and professional confidence in sharing my art," she says.  "From watercolor classes with the late Lee Boynton to the silk painting classes with Nadia Azumi, the instructors helped me lose my hesitation of expressing myself through my painting and have supported my reaching my dream of sharing my passion with the world."  

Two years ago Janey made the decision to pursue art as a full-time career.  She has created more than 500 works including silk scarves for women battling cancer.  "The most useful thing I learned through classes at Maryland Hall is to believe in yourself and your art. Whether you are a painter, sculptor, dancer, actor, writer....whatever your passion, take the leap to reach for your dreams.  One cannot fly unless you take that first leap!"

If you'd like to explore a Maryland Hall class for adults, browse through some of our fall offerings:

Learn to Draw

Glass Fusing

Painting

 

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