The Maryland Hall community is very sad to learn of the passing of MHCA instructor Lee Boynton.  Lee was a visual arts instructor for more than 25 years teaching hundreds of adult students the art of watercolor, pastel, oil and plein air painting.  Lee had a dedicated following for his classes and his skill and expertise as an instructor helped Maryland Hall become known for excellent instruction in the visual arts.

In addition to being a long-time instructor, Lee was an Artist-in-Resident from 1980 to 2004 and served on Maryland Hall’s Board of Directors from 1996 to 2004.
     
Linnell Bowen, MHCA President says, “I first met Lee in 1995 when he was selected to paint three large historical murals for the Annapolis City Hall for the 300th Anniversary Celebration.  The paintings are his legacy (and Annapolis’) for all to see. It required extensive research and detailed reenactments, taking over twelve months to complete and were first displayed at Maryland Hall.  We are grateful for his many years of teaching countless students with great dedication to his art form and to Maryland Hall.  He will be missed as an artist, a teacher and friend to all of us.” 

Lee received his BFA from Syracuse University in 1976 and continued his studies at the Art Students League in NYC.  He studied with Cedric and Joanette Egeli in Annapolis, MD and Henry Hensche at the Cape School of Art in Provincetown, MA.  Under Henry’s teaching, Lee embraced the wonders of Impressionism, seeing and painting the changing color of light using a palette of colors that corresponds the natural spectrum of light.  Lee took what he learned from Henry in oil and applied it to the watercolor medium.  Painting the Impressionist Watercolor, an instructional art book he co-authored with Linda Gottlieb, one of his longtime students, is based on his teaching.  It was published by Watson Guptill in 2004. Click here to read a full biography about Lee.  

A memorial service for artist Lee Boynton has been announced. It will take place Saturday, May 14, 2016 at 2 pm at Redemption House Life Center, 7489 Baltimore Annapolis Blvd, Glen Burnie, MD.   

A Go Fund Me account had been set up to assist his family with medical and other expenses.  Patrons who would like to make a donation can click here. 

Linnell Bowen was recently interviewed on Comcast Newsmakers about Maryland Hall's Spring events and performances.

Click here to see the interview.   

 

Thank you to the Severn Town Club for underwriting this event; and Annapolis Ice Cream Company.  

Main Stage
Annapolis Opera’s Faust set

First Floor
Academy Ballet School of Annapolis demonstration Room 101 2-4 pm 
Ballet Theater of Maryland demonstration Room 102
Letter Press Demonstration - Bob Hardy Room 110
Pottery Open Studio demonstration Room 112
Pottery ‘seconds sale’ Room 114 
Joe Dickey - Woodturning Demonstration Room 119 1:00-4:00pm 
Glass and ‘seconds sale’ Room 117A
Hands-on Activity for Children Room 117B
Etching-Sigrid Trumpy Room 117C
Maple Academy of Irish Dance Performance Gym: 2 -3 pm 
Raku Pottery Rear Parking Lot: 1-4 pm 
Grand Opening:  Lighthouse Catering Eatery 
ArtReach - Jovenes Artistas Art Show Hallway Gallery  

Second Floor
AYAP and Jovenes Artistas demonstrations Room 200
Voice Sample Classes - Alina Kozinska, Peabody Room 201:  3-4 pm
Face Painting Room 205
Annapolis Film Festival Room 212: 2 -4 pm
Andree Tullier – Figure Drawing for Teens Demo Room 213: 1-2:30pm
Ric Conn- Painting in Gouache Demo Room 214 1-3 pm
Don Cook Show and Gallery Talk Chaney Gallery
Maggie Sansone Chaney Gallery 1-2 pm
Opera, Theatre

Third Floor
Face Painting Room 300
Belly Dancing demonstration Room 301:  2:30-3:30 pm
Belly Dancing Mini-workshop with Carmen Nolte Room 301: 3:30-4:00pm
Popcorn Room 303
Eileen Razzetti dance classes Room 306
Peabody-Harp Recital Room 308 1-1:45 pm

In the Galleries
Don Cook Show and Gallery Talk Chaney Gallery 
AIR Exhibition Martino and Openshaw Galleries
ArtReach - Jovenes Artistas Art Show Hallway Gallery

 

Progression Photos - Stupa work in progress

     

 

       

 

      

 

Studio Tour with c.l.bigelow

  

Stupa trio in artist's studio                              Mixed media works

 

Mixed media nests made from found objects such as copper wire, conduit, knitting needles, barbed wire, etc.

 

 Views of the c.l.bigelow's studio at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts  

 

                                   

Interview with AIR c.l.bigelow

What projects are you working on at the moment? I am working on smaller pieces that are sculptural - using old hatpins, old beads, old bits of furniture. There are six or seven of them.

What are the primary materials that you use? Whatever comes to hand. My friend brought me a trunkful of electric conduit so I used it. I use car parts, nails, anything.

What’s your earliest memory of art? That’s easy. I was four years old. My mother used to buy leftover rolls of paper from the newspaper printer for me to play with. I remember I drew a giant penguin. It took me weeks to color it in. My mom was an artist so I grew up around it.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made? I don’t. If I had made it, it wouldn’t be the same.

How do you know when a work is finished? When I stop obsessing over it a 3 am. It might not be finished but it’s done.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?  It’s good.  I love being able to leave materials out and know that the dogs not going to get into it.  When I am done my work I can just shut the door. 

When you work, do you love the process or the result? Depends. Some stuff I just do to do, and other times it’s just a joy. I think that shows in the work. If I am slopping through something to finish, I realize, ‘I am done with this’ and find something else to work on. 

Which artists do you most admire? Susan Collis, Andy Goldsworthy, Vincent Van Gogh, Maya Lin, Christen Kobke. Kobke was a 19th c. Danish painter. Some of his work is as if there is just light on the canvas. These are not role models, I just love how they work. They all put only as much into the work that needs to be there. No bows no laces.

What is your creative ambition? To do the best work and then keep going.

What are the obstacles to this ambition? Me. My laziness. Self-doubts that creep in.

What are the vital steps to achieving this ambition? Pick yourself up and suck it up.  Everything else is an excuse.

How do you begin your day? Every other day I go swim. I have a cup of tea. Then I stare for a little - after I’ve let the dogs out. 

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat? Good breakfast - oatmeal. I do paperwork until ten or so. Mid-afternoon I eat again then continue working. When the light fades that’s it, whether it’s in the studio or at home, I’m done.

Is creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom? Yes. I find it with my husband, first and foremost. I run things by him. He can tell me, ‘that bothers me’. I value what he says. I also find it with friends here and my artist friends - we bounce ideas off each other. I have a found object group where we swap goods and help each other when we are stuck. We critique each other. The creative process is not just one person hidden away, it’s talking with one another.

Discipline: 
Painting
E-mail: 

Sue began her art career 30 years ago at Harrogate College of Art, UK, then received a B.A. Hons Degree at Leeds Metropolitan University. This was followed by teaching qualification from Huddersfield University in the North of England, where she has been teaching painting and drawing to six form students (age 17 –18) and adults for the last 20 years. Sue arrived in this country 7 years ago and became Vice President of the Annapolis Watercolor Club soon after she arrived here, holding that position for the next 6 years. She is an adjunct faculty teacher for AACC and teaches watercolor classes at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.  Sue believes teaching and learning  go hand in hand, she is always taking classes with master artists who she admires . . .  Hai Ou Hou, Abigail McBride, Mather Hillier, to name but a few, constantly learning new things to pass onto her students who are her primary focus at the moment. One of her greatest pleasures is nurturing the creative potential in her students. Sue also teaches workshops in the US and in the UK when she returns.

Sue enjoys Painting in both Watercolor and in Oils, she exhibits in the Chesapeake area.  Travelling provides inspiration for her favorite subjects, particularly  the natural environment, wildlife, exotic flora and fauna, portraits, landscape and seascapes. Having global associations, her paintings hang in collections in a variety of countries, UK, China, Dubai and Indonesia as well as the Florida Keys. At Maryland Hall Sue teaches a class called ‘Expressive Florals in Watercolor’ and in the summer she will introduce a course based on wildlife in the natural environment. . . . titled ‘The Splendor of Nature in Watercolor’.

Website: sueyoart@artspan.com

Progression Photos

 

 

 

 

Studio Tour with Nathanael Scott

  

Wood burnishing and found objects by AIR                  Current series in the making by Nathanael Scott

   

Charcoal drawings in Scott's studio                                 View of Scott's studio at Maryland Hall

       

Artwork inspired by Scott's previous job at a wood flooring company. Wood tile samples and found objects pictured.

Interview with AIR Nathanael Scott

What projects are you working on at the moment? 
I’m working with wood and a lot of found objects. I use re-purposed samples from a wood-flooring store that I used to work for. I was not happy at this place of employment and that came up in a lot of the themes I work with. It hit me why I was there one day. It was something about the materials; it reminded me more of a graveyard. I used the wood slabs and was resurrecting them to a degree. The artist, Leonard Drew, he works with wood. He weathers the wood, burns, and scorches it. He lets it sit out in the sun, aging it and giving it character. I didn’t want to do carving or big sculptures so I was and am really inspired by him.

What are the primary materials that you use?  
Wood and found materials. I use chicken wire and different plastics. Even with my older work, it’s a process that comes naturally. There are themes that come up in my work; perspective and perception. I like to get my work to a perfect rough draft through trial and error. Then it will start to create itself. 

How do you know when a work is finished? 
To me, the work has multiple lives. The first life is when I am putting it together, here in my studio. When it is presented in a show or commission, that’s its second life-cycle. I am making my work to be open-ended. I like abstract art. It can be so many things. I like for my work to say a certain thing but not be too clear. I want people to have different opinions about it. 

When you work, do you love the process or the result?
The process. It is very physical. Art is always therapeutic for me. The process is very important and it allows the finished product to be different from the initial result I had in mind. Also, I like to take my time to make my work. 

What is your ideal creative activity? 
 I think of art itself as a conversation. Materials are like a language. I’m more comfortable speaking in certain languages - or materials. I’m always talking about the same things but sometimes I use a different language. Other creative activities for me…I like to listen to instrumental, classical, or jazz music. The bible. Books, either spiritual or astrological. 

How do you begin your day?

When I am in a good creative place I get up and pray. I might fast if I am working on something very important. Art is therapeutic and spiritual and if I go into it in that way I will accomplish more of what I want to accomplish. I like to block everything else out. 

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?
It is very important to me. It was easier in college, but this interview is proof I can still talk your ear off about art. I have a friend who is a world-renowned artist. I like to go to his house and take some work there and we talk about different things. Art is always a conversation.

 

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