Analogous is a series of site-specific works and photographic experiments that investigate the current state of photography. The works in this series make use of materials that have become increasingly obsolete in photographic practice, such as grey cards, instant film and obscure darkroom tools. By repurposing these objects, the project addresses photography’s past with reverence, while at the same time acknowledging its digital future. Also included in this project are two collaborative pieces with artist Todd Forsgren that delve into issues of art history education and the transition to digital archives in the arts.

I want to thank Maryland Hall and Sigrid Trumpy in particular for having the courage to put up shows they know are not going to sell work.  There are a plethora of private galleries in Annapolis that reinforce the cities’ reputation for having an un-evolved art scene.  What I have discovered in Annapolis is a small but sophisticated audience of people that crave more engaging art.  As an art center and not a private gallery, Maryland Hall has a duty to put up more challenging art exhibitions and thankfully they are rising to that challenge more and more of late.  I also think it is critical for artists in the community to fight the urge to make artwork that they think will sell in Annapolis.  It would be impossible to hold galleries in this town to higher standards if the artists themselves are feeding them derivative art.  Monet did a great job of being Monet all by himself.  And his art was cutting edge at the time he made it.  I think we owe it to ourselves, as a community, to foster the same type of cutting edge spirit for ourselves!

-Matthew Moore

 
Art history slides from AACC.
 
​Art History Slides repurposed for Matt's show Analogous.
 
Art History Slides that were saved by Matt Moore for his latest show.
 
Matt Moore in his studio at Maryland Hall.
 
Matt Working on 'Rose Window' for his show 'Analogous' at Maryland Hall.
 
Final Product of Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' in their show 'Analogous'​.
 
Light trickling thorugh Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' at Maryland Hall's Martino Gallery.
 
'Rose Window' giving the Martino Gallery a stained glass effect on the floor.
 
 
 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Matt Moore takes you on a tour of her studio in Studio 312A.

Testing out work for his exhibition Analogous​ on display in the Martino Gallery now.

 

Photo slide panel for his exhibition Analogous​.

 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Over the weekend, members of a street artists group called Urban Walls Brazil took over the first floor hallway at Maryland Hall. They transformed the blank hallways into beautiful works of art. If you haven't seen their work yet, we highly recommend you stop by Maryland Hall to check it out. Below are some before, during and after photos.

Click here to see more photos of the murals.

 

About Urban Walls Brazil

Urban Walls Brazil is the brainchild of art lover, Roberta Pardo. Born out of a traveling exhibition that made its way to Washington D.C., NYC, Annapolis and Sao Paulo, Urban Walls Brazil has grown into an ongoing Urban Art project that has unlimited potential.

Through murals and workshops, Urban Walls Brazil creates an exchange between cultures and opens the market between the United States and Brazil. Roberta houses the Brazilan artists through her residency program, where they are able to interact with local artists and work on community art projects.

Native of Brazil with dual citizenship, Roberta Pardo has lived in Maryland for the last 13 years, She spent most of her youth traveling the world and can speak 6 languages. Prior to focusing on art, Roberta was an international horse rider and trainer, competing for her native country and in numerous international competitions. Roberta’s background is in Industrial Design and Fine Arts. Her education includes FAAP (Fundacao Armando Alvez Penteado) in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Her great passion is Street Art for its connection between art and environment. 

Website: www.urbanwallsbrazil.com

President of Maryland Hall, Linnell Bowen, recently sat down with Comcast's Elena Russo to discuss upcoming performances, classes and exhibitions at Maryland Hall. Click the video below to watch the full interview. 

 

A Connection in Clay artist Hank Murrow will host a gallery talk and slide presentation in the Chaney Gallery on Thursday, October 1 from 5:30–7 pm. 

About Hank Murrow


 

My three younger brothers and I endured a Jesuit education which was classical, vigorous, and abstract; so I was a sitting duck for the simultaneous encounter with Bob James and clay at the U. of Oregon in 1958. I was ripe for the idea of developing something from raw materials to an object transformed by the fire. At my first review, Bob turned over each piece to carefully regard the bottom before he looked at the rest of it; and I marveled, 'Hey, there's more to this than I thought!' ... which has continued to be true for 58 years.

David Stannard joined the faculty as I was beginning graduate work, and his gorgeous pots and profound understanding of materials perfectly balanced Bob's commitment to subject matter enfolded in rich metaphor. Together, they created an atmosphere of inquiry in the studio which encouraged us to share and learn from each other while remaining alert to our own calling. I was also very lucky to participate in six-week-long workshops with both Shoji Hamada and Michael Cardew; and to work alongside Jane Heald in our wonderful PotShop in Venice, California.

After earning a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1967, I went to Mexico to work for an art center in La Paz, Baja California. I married Bev Wickstrom in 1969 and took up a teaching post at Ohio University with George Kokis. During 1970-73 I was teaching at Anderson Ranch in Snowmass, Colorado with Brad Reed. Bev and I returned to Eugene in 1974, where she began working for the University; while I divided my time between developing kiln designs and work in my studio there.

Back in 1969 some students from my pottery class and I were visiting the art history prof at his home and studio, when I noticed a box on a side table. I asked what was in it and he said, 'You can open it......if you do it over the carpet'. Inside the beautiful box was a brocaded cloth bag, & inside the bag was a teabowl with a lumpy white & orange glaze. At first I thought it might be rough, but once I got it into my hands I was seduced by its comforting texture and light weight. The pits inside the bowl held tiny pockets of bright green from its use as a teabowl. I asked what it was and he said, 'Shino........four hundred years old.' Well, I put it back in the bag and the box, but never out of my mind, chasing it ever since! 

About the Exhibit

A Connection in Clay - In Pursuit of Craft is an invitational show of American potters displaying how skills are transferred through lessons taught from master to student.  This partnership in pursuit of craft has been ongoing from the time where firing of ceramics was the high technology, traveling through the industrial revolution and into today’s art and craft movements.  

We invited emerging artists and their mentor. Also current masters (who named their mentors and influences) together with artists they are influencing in the next generation of studio potters.  The show displays the story of this ongoing dialog between potters and their relationship in craft.

The current studio pottery in America movement owes a great deal to Bernard Leach (1887-1979), Shoji Hamada (1894-1978) and Soestsu Yanagi (1889-1961).  As Michael Webb in his book, Introduction to Bernard Leach, Hamada & Their Circle stated, “The meeting of Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada in 1919 … started ripples which are still widening today and which may be considered one of the crucial events in twentieth century ceramic history.”  Leach, an Englishman, and Hamada, a like-minded Japanese potter friend, discovered pottery in Japan early in the twentieth century and devoted their lives to utilitarian pottery as an art form.  

Our show illustrates the diverse product from this connection in clay of Hamada and Leach and the interconnections of the potters in this exhibit. For example, Jeff Oestreich was encouraged by Warren MacKenzie to apprentice with Leach at St. Ives, which Jeff did starting 1968 and Jeff is one of the current pillars of the American mingei philosophy of utilitarian beauty today.  Another is Hank Murrow who in the sixties studied with Shoji Hamada for a shorter period of time; the Eastern influence is present in his work. 

Not everyone could have personally studied or apprenticed with Hamada or Leach, but the strength of the tradition, and the passing of knowledge and skills continues. We can see it in the connections between Chris Gustin and Seth Rainville, between Matthew Hyleck and Camilla Ascher and Missy Steele at Baltimore Clayworks (one of the important national centers for ceramics in the US), between Dale Huffman and Justin Rothshank and Missy Steele, between Matt Kelleher and Kenyon Hansen, and between Gail Kendall and Joseph Pintz. Many other connections take place; between Chris Gustin, one of the original founders of the Watershed Center in Maine, and Elizabeth Kendall the current president of the board of Watershed Center.  Even this exhibit can form connections in clay between you and the potters.

Discipline: 
Visual Arts
E-mail: 

Biography

David Lawton is currently the president of the Maryland Society of Portrait Painters and a past president of the Maryland Pastel Society. He has studied here and abroad, with the most notable being the Art Students League in New York. In addition he has had the opportunity to study with some of today’s finest artist such as Cedric Egeli and Albert Handell.

David divides his time between Oils and Pastels knowing that each has its own unique attributes. David currently teaches at AACC focusing on pastel and plein air painting.
David strives to see the beauty in the most simplistic of subjects and thus he tries to capture the essence of his subject in as direct and straightforward manner as possible. Knowing what to eliminate is as important to David as what he chooses to include in his paintings.  

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on my show that goes up in the Martino Gallery called Analogues which is a collaborative project with Todd Forsgren. Todd used to have a studio right across the hall and we were handed this idea about a dual show. It wasn’t something we pitched, it was just kind of there. We are taking old art history picture slides that we rescued from Anne Arundel Community College that were going to be thrown away. We are covering large acetate rolls with them to stick in the windows. We are hoping for good sunlight in the windows the night of the opening reception because they will look like large stained-glass windows. The slides will project light and shadows onto the floor to create a really cool image.

What are the primary materials that you use?  

I shoot on film still. I generally work on medium format, sometimes large format. For this show I am also using “found objects” and repurposing them into something new. That is a little bit different for me.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

In a way I feel like this question gives the impression that artists have some early childhood epiphany that they are going to become artists and I just don’t think that is true. Just because I liked art class in kindergarten, isn’t the reason I am an artist. Everyone liked art class. I know other people that had that early epiphany but for me it’s just not how I got here.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

There are no works that I wish I had made or didn’t make. I hate the sound of it because it sounds kind of… I don’t know. I certainly have a lot of ideas for projects, and with none of them do I think ‘I’m not going to end up doing that’. It’s either been done or will be done.

How do you know when a work is finished?

That is intuitive. I think that it is a real challenge for people. I usually have to try to force myself to push further. You get to a point with a work of art where you think its great and even your friends and artist-friends think it is great but generally in the back of your mind you know it could be better. It’s really hard to push further and take the risk of ruining what people think is really great. But, it’s really important to take that risk.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

Both. I am going to admit that I do get a real thrill from the result. I like the process, I love the result. It’s just nice to see something finished and to realize you made that – it’s a boost for the ego and it helps you maintain your confidence. A lot of times when you are making something you are not sure where it is going. You start taping slides onto acetate for hours and your back hurts and you think ‘what if this stinks?. It is always nice to hear what other people think but its more of a personal thrill.

What is your ideal creative activity?

I really love working in the dark room at night. Sometimes I will go into the dark room, put on music and make prints for the sake of making prints. 

Which artists do you most admire?

Todd Forsgren. www.toddforsgren.com

Why are they your role models?

He isn’t really my role model. He is an artist that I admire. My grandfather was my role model. He taught me how to live.

Does anyone in your life regularly inspire you?

My wife. She is very supportive of me as an artist. Sometimes that means putting more energy into our home than I do. I’ve been married for a long while and there was a time when we first got married where I went to her and said ‘I’m going to quit this job and work on this project and we are going to be poor for a while, is that ok?’ and she was like ‘go for it’. That project helped launch my career. It did launch my career. So I basically owe it all to her.

Who is your muse and why?

I don’t know that I have a muse. I don’t think I’m that type of artist that gets obsessed with one thing.

What is your creative ambition?

I want to take a metals class. I want to learn to weld. It’s not because I want to make sculptures it’s more because I want to make functional objects. I want to learn how to make a coffee table.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

Time. I’m very busy.

What are the vital steps to achieving this ambition?

The answer is you just have to do it. You have to prioritize it and once it’s a priority you will do it. There is time to do stuff; you just have to decide what’s important. Right now it’s important for me to make certain projects before I make coffee tables. It’ll happen. To be honest it is something I have been planning on doing this year.

How do you begin your day?

I’m a big coffee drinker so that has to be a part of the equation. And, I usually just let my kids crawl around and play in the living room before I go off to work.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

I don’t really have habits. Coffee is a habit. My wife and I like to go out to breakfast once a week. We are big breakfast people. We like to travel in the summer. But, I don’t really have any obsessive compulsive habits that keep me centered or anything like that.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

Creative dialogue is absolutely essential. What’s the opposite of that, you know, right? Hiding in your basement? Creative dialogue has to happen and it has to happen all the time. I have a number of people I can count on for that dialogue. Some of them are fellow colleagues at Anne Arundel Community College and some are my friends or even some of the residents here. Also, engaging my students in dialogue on a daily basis is part of the reason I teach. My job is such a pleasure. Working with those young people learning photography and getting to see them expose their first print in the dark room, I get to see that moment every semester. I can’t have that moment anymore but I get to see them have it and it is really energizing for me.

 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Founded in 2014 by cellist Natalie Spehar, the Annapolis Young Artists Program (AYAP) serves as a unique opportunity for community musicians to develop high-level performance technique as well as entrepreneurial and leadership skills. Led by faculty members and guest artists that have excelled as performers as well as entrepreneurs in a variety of disciplines, AYAP members work with fantastic mentors that have used innovation to stand out in a highly competitive professional environment. AYAP fosters creativity, diligence, effective communication and community, inspiring a valuable and versatile skill set in all its participants.

AYAP is thrilled to open its workshops and performance opportunities to members of Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts this season. 

AYAP Guest Artist Workshops

Ages: 
9+
Member: 
90.00
Non-Member: 
115.00
 
 
 
Saturday, August 29 | 10 - 11:30 am - “Listening to Classical Music for Study and Enjoyment” Workshop with AYAP Faculty member Zack Stachowski
In this AYAP group session, faculty member Zack Stachowski will demonstrate an effective approach to listening to classical music. He will address specific aspects of recordings that add to listening enjoyment and explore how this can influence and inform one’s own approach to performance.
 
Saturday, September 12 | 10 - 11:30 am - Member Performance Class with AYAP Faculty
AYAP members perform for one another and share constructive feedback in a studio class format. The class is moderated by AYAP Faculty members, including musicians from Annapolis and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras.​
 
Saturday, September 26 | 10 - 11:30 am - “Exploring the Visual Elements of Classical Performance” Workshop with NYC Producer, Justin Nardecchia and AYAP Director, Natalie Spehar
NYC movie producer Justin Nardecchia joins AYAP Director Natalie Spehar to talk about stage presence and concert production. Together, they will explore the visual elements of a music performance and share tips on how to create an engaging environment for presenting art and music.
 
Saturday, October 24 | 10 - 11:30 am - Workshop with Invoke Bowed and Fretted String Quartet
Invoke joins AYAP members to discuss composition, improvisation in a chamber setting, and helpful tips for collaborating with fellow chamber musicians.​
 

Saturday, November 14 | 10 - 11:30 am - Member Performance Class with AYAP Faculty
AYAP members perform for one another and share constructive feedback in a studio class format. The class is moderated by AYAP Faculty members, including musicians from Annapolis and Baltimore Symphony Orchestras.
 
Saturday, November 21 | 10 - 11:30 am - “Trends and Techniques in Contemporary Classical Music” Panel Discussion with NYC Artists Paperwing
New music architects” - Paperwing - spend a morning with AYAP students discussing classical new music trends and demonstrating interesting extended techniques in classical music. In addition, the group will share some tips for collaborating with composers and strategies for gaining support for one’s own new music project.
 

AYAP Fall Concert Series

Invoke Bowed and Fretted String Quartet
Friday, October 23 | 7 pm

Invoke Quartet highlights the “new sound of the American quartet”, performing original compositions off of their album “Souls in the Mud.” 

 

Paperwing in Concert   
Saturday, November 21 | 7 pm

“New music architects” - Paperwing - present an evening of accessible contemporary classical music. 

 

AYAP Member Recital  
Saturday, December 5 | 3 pm   
Tickets: $6

Members of AYAP & AYAP Reach (an Annapolis-based music volunteer organization) perform their current repertoire for the Annapolis community.

 

 

Maryland Hall recently added letterpress workshops to their curriculum and staff had the opportunity to spend the afternoon in the studio with the instructor, Bob Hardy. Bob showed us around the studio and gave us an in depth look into the world of letterpress. The afternoon was very interesting and informative. We highly recommend you sign up for the intro to letterpress workshop on Saturday, August 15 from 10 am - 2 pm. Click here for more information on the workshop and to sign up today!

Here are some photos from our afternoon in the letterpress studio. Don't forget to check out the Letterpress as Art & Function: American Primitive Letterpress at Maryland Hall exhibition on display in the Chaney Gallery through August 31.

 

Maryland Hall is pleased to announce the 2015-2016 Performing Arts Season! Tickets go on sale for members only on August 12 at noon. Members will receive an email with the promo code to access tickets. If you do not receive the email, please call the main office at 410-263-5544 ext. 10. Tickets go on sale to the public on August 17 at noon. 

You can purchase tickets online or call the Box Office at 410-280-5640. The Box Office is open Monday through Friday from 12 pm - 5 pm and two hours prior to ticketed performances. Remember, if you are a Maryland Hall member, you can purchase tickets at a discounted price!

 

Art Sherrod Jr.
Sunday, September 20 | 4 pm
Tickets: Non-Member $25, Member $20

National recording artist and smooth jazz saxophonist Art Sherrod Jr. will be in full concert as he releases his new Gospel Jazz album.

 

The Jason Bishop Show
Saturday, November 21 | 7:30 pm
Tickets: Non-Member $25, Member $20, Child $20

Jason Bishop performs stunning, state of the art magic and illusions. Each show features amazing sleight of hand, exclusive grand illusions and even close-up magic projected onto huge screens. Come see why he’s called America’s Hottest Illusionist!

 

An A Cappella Holiday with The Capital Hearings
Saturday, December 5 | 7:30 pm
Tickets: Non-Member $20, Member $15, Child $15

The Capital Hearings return to Maryland Hall with their signature holiday concert. The Capital Hearings will be making spirits bright with a festive, family-friendly program of beloved carols, smooth vocal jazz, and sparkling contemporary arrangements. 

 

LUMA Theater
Tuesday, April 12 | 7:30 pm
Tickets: Non-Member $29, Member $24

LUMA plunges the audience into a darkened space where a tapestry of illuminated illusions fills the stage. Combining rhythmic gymnastics, dance, magic, puppetry, physics and experimental methods LUMA is a singular experience that mesmerizes and mystifies leaving audiences full of wonder, slack jawed and goggle-eyed; An unforgettable evening.

 

Juanito Pascual New Flamenco Trio
Friday, April 22 | 7:30 pm
Tickets: Non-Member $20, Member $15

The Juanito Pascual New Flamenco Trio features top flamenco guitarist Juanito Pascual, world class percussionist Tupac Mantilla and stunning bassist Brad Barrett. The trio creates a sound that seamlessly merges flamenco with elements of jazz, world-music and even rock and soul influences.

 

Footworks
Saturday, April 30 | 7:30 pm
Tickets: Non-Member $20, Member $15

Fiery fancy footwork sets the stage ablaze when the aptly named company, Footworks, returns to Maryland Hall for another spectacular performance.  Known for its energetic and imaginative choreography, Footworks combines the elements of clog, step, and tap into a fast-paced, exuberant dance production that leaves both entertainer and audience breathless. 

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