Annapolis

"Winter Sleeper" in the early stages, with the addition of detail as it progresses.

Working on "Winter Sleeper."

"Winter Sleeper" ready to be unloaded from the glaze kiln. It was fired to about 1888 degrees in the electric kiln and covered in a matt textured black glaze mixed by me.

The finished piece ready to be packed and shipped to the New Bedford Art Museum.

 

For more information about Lindsay, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Lindsay Pichaske takes you on a tour of her studio.

I have a wall of tools and a wall of inspirational images. These tools are ones I use frequently, and I love having them out and visible, do I know where everything is. The images are of other artists' work, reference animal images, and images of interesting objects and textures that I've photographed.

I usually begin a piece by doing a quick, large scale drawing. These are examples of some previous pieces.

I keep a collection of natural found objects in my windowsill. These are my 'natural history museum' in the studio. They are objects I use as reference, and as textural inspiration in my work.

I also keep texture test tiles around my studio for reference for specific materials. Here I have an example of pinecone 'petals'.

I typically start each piece by making a quick maquette (small model). This quick study helps me work out the pose, gesture and proportions before starting on the larger piece.

 

For more information about Lindsay, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

 

Interview conducted by Gallery Director Sigrid Trumpy.

So let's start with the question about your experience at Art Basel Miami, the recent Art Fair you attended.
 
So there are a few different layers to that question. First of all I’d never been, so the experience of seeing that much blue chip art all in one space was pretty remarkable. I saw several pieces of artwork that I had only ever admired on the internet or in magazines. It was fun seeing this high caliber of work outside of the museum context and in a commercial setting. In some ways it made the artwork  a lot more intimate and accessible. 
   
This was also my first experience showing at an art fair there (Scope). It was wonderful exposure and was the most gorgeous place I’ve ever shown work in.  It was exciting to see my piece in that context, amidst the work of so many other artists and galleries.

So what are the primary materials that you use?

To sculpt the pieces I use low-fire clay (terra-cotta) and I fire them once in electric or gas kilns. I’ve been using the kilns here, which is very convenient. I fire to 1945° F, which means that the clay is almost vitrified, but hasn’t gotten so hot that it risks shrinkage or cracking. Clay is such a natural material to build figures out of because it's so skin-like and animate. Working with clay is kind of like working with another living creature. 

The second part of my process involves creating these skin-like second coats for the pieces. Materials that I have used in the past are string that wraps around the animal’s body to articulate the musculature, sequins, sticks, and feathers. I am interested in mimicking the muscle patterns but also in these materials becoming surreal fur or hair across the animal’s body.

You mentioned that you relate to the clay as a material but then you cover it so you lose the feel of the clay. How would you describe that transition?

I love the clay when it's wet and feels alive. When it's fired it dies for me and feels very sterile. The act of covering it with another material that I can get to know really intimately makes it slowly come back to life. 

I love the process because I feel that I’m bringing an unknown creature into existence and getting to know a new being (although I realize they are just made objects). When I’m sculpting it’s as though I’m creating a new, hybrid creature. The act of covering it’s body is a process that is almost opposite to the sculpting. It’s not as physical, but rather meditative and introspective. 

So talk about your earliest memory of art and how that has affected you now?

When I was in early elementary school my mom was in architecture school and I was her model assistant.  I would cut tiny trees to specific sizes and glue tiny pieces of wood for her models. I have the strong memory of being about seven and loving working in the studio with all these exuberant young people and just loving that tedious process. It wasn't even a visual memory of art, but rather it was the physical act of doing it that I fell in love with. 

Which artist do you most admire and are role models?

Kiki Smith and Louise Bourgeois--both for their prolific careers and work ethic. Kiki Smith for her subject matter. Her sculptures, which are full of dark folklore and hybrid creatures really resonate with me. Her piece, Born, for instance, depicts a female figure being born of deer, is something I look to again and again. 

Louis Bourgeois for some of the reasons we just talked about with Kiki Smith, and the fact that she continued to make deeply personal yet potent sculptural work into her 100's! She was making figurative work at a time and it wasn't very popular to be doing so. Further, her work has such emotional, personal, and psychological power. 

For more information about Lindsay, visit her Artist-in-Residence profile

 

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every Monday for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall President, Linnell Bowen, sat down with Comcast Newsmakers' Elena Russo to discuss the first phase of renovations and future renovations. Click the video below to watch the full interview.
 

The recent performance by the Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra at Maryland Hall was featured in a mini-documentary. The 21 minute mini-documentary features interviews with the PRSO Director, Andrew Greene, talks about the orchestra, shows behind the scenes and clips from the show on November 1 and more! Click the video below to watch the full documentary.

Film by John Thornton

Donna Anderson, Maryland Hall VP of Marketing & Development, recently sat down with Comcast's Elena Russo to talk about upcoming performances at Maryland Hall. To watch the complete interview, click on the video below.

All you need is ten or more people to enjoy a performance to receive a reduced ticket price for a group.  You don’t need to be an official organization or club to qualify.  Just find ten friends, relatives or co-workers and you can receive discounts on tickets for selected performances and save money on ticket fees.  Groups pay a flat $7 fee for a group ticket order.

To order group tickets, please come in or call the Box Office between noon and 5 pm, Monday through Friday, at 410-280-5640 or 410-263-5544, press 0.  You must pay for your order with a single credit card or a check at the time of reservation.  Email the box office with questions:  boxoffice@mdhallarts.org

 

The following Maryland Hall performances have group ticket prices:

Spooky Silents:  A Silent Film Halloween with the Peacherine Ragtime Society Orchestra: Saturday, November 1, 7:30 pm.  Group price:  $13/person.

Comedy Pet Theatre: Friday, March 20, 7:30 pm. Group price: $12/person.

The following Ballet Theatre of Maryland performances have group ticket prices:

A Mid Summer Night's Dream: Friday, October 24, 7:30 pm; Saturday, October 25, 7 pm; and Sunday, October 26, 2 pm.  Group price: $42.30/person (section A); $36/person (section B)

The Nutcracker: Saturday, December 13, 7 pm; Sunday, December 14, 1 and 4:30 pm; Saturday, December 20, 7 pm; Sunday, December 21, 1 and 4:30 pm.  Group price:  $42.30/person.

Cinderella: Friday, February 20, 7:30 pm; Saturday, February 21, 7 pm; Sunday, February 22, 2 pm.  Group price:  $42.30/person.

Innovations 2015: Friday, April 17, 7:30 pm; Saturday, April 18, 7 pm; Sunday, April 19, 2 pm.  Group price:  $42.30/person (section A); $36/person (section B)

Maryland Hall is planning an October Volunteer Orientation with positions open in performing arts ushering, special events, visual arts and some office assistance.  We welcome your interest in our volunteer opportunities.  Please contact Louise White, Volunteer Manager at lwhite@mdhallarts.org, as to whether or not you will be able to attend Thursday, October 9, 5:30 – 7:00 pm.  

 
For ushering positions there will be an additional usher training date set for Thursday, October 16, 5:30 – 7:30 pm.  If you are unable to attend this date, we will be offering a daytime usher training also in October, date to be set.    

 


 
Volunteers are a vital part of maintaining Maryland Hall’s reputation as an outstanding arts center serving the entire region.  As a multi-discipline arts center, Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts is dedicated to providing an exceptional opportunity for lifelong community participation in arts education, the visual arts and performing arts.  
 
Volunteer Benefits:

  • Nurturing the arts at MHCA
  • Ensuring the success of programs
  • Community involvement
  • Arts-related fellowship 

 
 

 

 

Artist-in-Residence Patrice Drago has a couple of exhibits around Annapolis in October.

Stop by and check them out! 

Summer Haze, Acrylic on Canvas

 

"Above the Surface"

Patrice Drago's solo show of abstract sailboat and marine-themed art will be on display at 49 West
from October 3 - 31. There will be an opening reception on Sunday, October 5 from 5 - 7 pm. 

 

49 West Coffeehouse, Winebar & Gallery
49 West St
Annapolis, MD 21401
Website

 

 Brisk Afternoon

 

"Art of the Forest"

Patrice Drago will be part of a multi-artist, multi-media exhibit of art that reflects the poetry of trees at West Annapolis Artworks from October 2 - November 8. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, October 16 from 5 - 8 p.m.

West Annapolis Artworks
4 Annapolis Street
Annapolis, MD 21401
Website

 

Choose from a variety of workshops throughout the Fall. There are several one-day, two-day and weekend workshops for all ages. Click the images below to browse through our Fall Workshops. 

  

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Annapolis