artist in residence

Progression Photos - Stupa work in progress

     

 

       

 

      

 

Studio Tour with c.l.bigelow

  

Stupa trio in artist's studio                              Mixed media works

 

Mixed media nests made from found objects such as copper wire, conduit, knitting needles, barbed wire, etc.

 

 Views of the c.l.bigelow's studio at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts  

 

                                   

Interview with AIR c.l.bigelow

What projects are you working on at the moment? I am working on smaller pieces that are sculptural - using old hatpins, old beads, old bits of furniture. There are six or seven of them.

What are the primary materials that you use? Whatever comes to hand. My friend brought me a trunkful of electric conduit so I used it. I use car parts, nails, anything.

What’s your earliest memory of art? That’s easy. I was four years old. My mother used to buy leftover rolls of paper from the newspaper printer for me to play with. I remember I drew a giant penguin. It took me weeks to color it in. My mom was an artist so I grew up around it.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made? I don’t. If I had made it, it wouldn’t be the same.

How do you know when a work is finished? When I stop obsessing over it a 3 am. It might not be finished but it’s done.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?  It’s good.  I love being able to leave materials out and know that the dogs not going to get into it.  When I am done my work I can just shut the door. 

When you work, do you love the process or the result? Depends. Some stuff I just do to do, and other times it’s just a joy. I think that shows in the work. If I am slopping through something to finish, I realize, ‘I am done with this’ and find something else to work on. 

Which artists do you most admire? Susan Collis, Andy Goldsworthy, Vincent Van Gogh, Maya Lin, Christen Kobke. Kobke was a 19th c. Danish painter. Some of his work is as if there is just light on the canvas. These are not role models, I just love how they work. They all put only as much into the work that needs to be there. No bows no laces.

What is your creative ambition? To do the best work and then keep going.

What are the obstacles to this ambition? Me. My laziness. Self-doubts that creep in.

What are the vital steps to achieving this ambition? Pick yourself up and suck it up.  Everything else is an excuse.

How do you begin your day? Every other day I go swim. I have a cup of tea. Then I stare for a little - after I’ve let the dogs out. 

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat? Good breakfast - oatmeal. I do paperwork until ten or so. Mid-afternoon I eat again then continue working. When the light fades that’s it, whether it’s in the studio or at home, I’m done.

Is creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom? Yes. I find it with my husband, first and foremost. I run things by him. He can tell me, ‘that bothers me’. I value what he says. I also find it with friends here and my artist friends - we bounce ideas off each other. I have a found object group where we swap goods and help each other when we are stuck. We critique each other. The creative process is not just one person hidden away, it’s talking with one another.

Progression Photos

 

 

 

 

Studio Tour with Nathanael Scott

  

Wood burnishing and found objects by AIR                  Current series in the making by Nathanael Scott

   

Charcoal drawings in Scott's studio                                 View of Scott's studio at Maryland Hall

       

Artwork inspired by Scott's previous job at a wood flooring company. Wood tile samples and found objects pictured.

Interview with AIR Nathanael Scott

What projects are you working on at the moment? 
I’m working with wood and a lot of found objects. I use re-purposed samples from a wood-flooring store that I used to work for. I was not happy at this place of employment and that came up in a lot of the themes I work with. It hit me why I was there one day. It was something about the materials; it reminded me more of a graveyard. I used the wood slabs and was resurrecting them to a degree. The artist, Leonard Drew, he works with wood. He weathers the wood, burns, and scorches it. He lets it sit out in the sun, aging it and giving it character. I didn’t want to do carving or big sculptures so I was and am really inspired by him.

What are the primary materials that you use?  
Wood and found materials. I use chicken wire and different plastics. Even with my older work, it’s a process that comes naturally. There are themes that come up in my work; perspective and perception. I like to get my work to a perfect rough draft through trial and error. Then it will start to create itself. 

How do you know when a work is finished? 
To me, the work has multiple lives. The first life is when I am putting it together, here in my studio. When it is presented in a show or commission, that’s its second life-cycle. I am making my work to be open-ended. I like abstract art. It can be so many things. I like for my work to say a certain thing but not be too clear. I want people to have different opinions about it. 

When you work, do you love the process or the result?
The process. It is very physical. Art is always therapeutic for me. The process is very important and it allows the finished product to be different from the initial result I had in mind. Also, I like to take my time to make my work. 

What is your ideal creative activity? 
 I think of art itself as a conversation. Materials are like a language. I’m more comfortable speaking in certain languages - or materials. I’m always talking about the same things but sometimes I use a different language. Other creative activities for me…I like to listen to instrumental, classical, or jazz music. The bible. Books, either spiritual or astrological. 

How do you begin your day?

When I am in a good creative place I get up and pray. I might fast if I am working on something very important. Art is therapeutic and spiritual and if I go into it in that way I will accomplish more of what I want to accomplish. I like to block everything else out. 

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?
It is very important to me. It was easier in college, but this interview is proof I can still talk your ear off about art. I have a friend who is a world-renowned artist. I like to go to his house and take some work there and we talk about different things. Art is always a conversation.

 

Progression Photos by Brian Kyhos

 

 

Studio Tour with AIR Brian Kyhos

  

Pastels used in Bryan Kyhos' latest work                   AIR Brian Kyhos' studio at Maryland Hall

 

  

Ink and color from the artist's sketchbook                 Ink drawing in Brian Kyhos' sketchbook

 

  

Sketches by Artist-In-Residence Brian Kyhos           Window view of the artist's studio

 

An Interview with Brian Kyhos

What projects are you working on at the moment? Pastel drawing or paintings, depending on the way you look at them. They are also somewhat sculptural. I also do actual sculpture but I haven’t gotten into that in my studio here at Maryland Hall.

What are the primary materials that you use?  I’m working with pastel now but I also like oil painting. I have done all phases of bronze casting which was my first love. I love to work with modeling wax - it’s a very meditative process. I am mindful of the history of the material. I work with whatever materials I have at hand. I’ve been accused of being a pack-rat.

What’s your earliest memory of art? I’m not sure. I was always drawing with crayons. I was one of those kids that on my first day of kindergarten I drew a ship on the ocean and kids thought it really looked like one. I guess I have always had an innate ability.

How do you know when a work is finished? A lot of my thinking takes place in my sketchbooks. I will keep drawing and working until my brain gets so that I want to make something different. The beauty of sketchbooks is there are different ways to draw. Analytical is where you are trying to draw a figure and you want to record what you are seeing. Or, you draw out from yourself like a self-expression to get in touch with your inner side. I do both.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected? It has been mostly great. A few distractions but the atmosphere is very supportive. And, seeing the children come in for the dance classes is wonderful. I always love meeting artists and new people. I love the social connections.

When you work, do you love the process or the result? I like both. You know the writer Henry Miller? He would make these artworks and he would sneak down at night to see them because it gave him such joy to look at them. I occasionally give work to people and I call them my children. Sometimes I forget that I have given them out and I will see them at people’s houses. I say it is like visiting my children.

What is your ideal creative activity? I love creative writing and taking pictures. Taking a walk or making food can also be a creative undertaking.

Which artists do you most admire? I like the Wyeth family. Andrew, N.C., Jamie, and Peter Hurd. The Wyeth studio is open to the public in Brandywine Pennsylvania. N.C. always considered himself to be an illustrator but he elevated it to a fine art and I love it when people are able to do that. Then it becomes a spiritual thing. For me art and music are very spiritual.

Why are they your role models? The Wyeth’s, Michelangelo, Georgia O’Keefe, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer… there work always resonates with me. I have done a lot of reading about artists and their lives. It is always interesting to see what life they lived. Salvador Dali was very playful - as was Picasso - and that is the attitude I try to have in my work as well.

Does anyone in your life regularly inspire you? My wife does. She is a good worker and is good to use as a sounding board. My kids are too. They are all very positive in their outlooks on life. 

Who is your muse and why? My wife is definitely a muse. She inspires me to not get stuck in places and keep moving. My dog ruby is a muse for sure. He is a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. He’s a show stopper.

What is your creative ambition? World Domination. No, My ambition as I am here is to create a new body of work, to have a show and have people enjoy it.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat? I like to drink tea and enjoy a glass or two of wine. I like to go on walks with my wife.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom? I feel pretty secure in who I am and what I like to do. Dialog as far as being influenced if people like my work or not - I am not concerned with that. I like the idea of storytelling. I like people to create their own ideas about my work.

I think a lot of artists get funny about making copies of things that they like. A lot of the great masters did just that and went to museums and copied art. That’s how you learn. I find it a very helpful habit. I like to write and I have done the same thing with writing. I started keeping a journal, mostly to remember happy times, and gradually overtime they would turn into a place where I would copy passages that I have read. It is important to do that. 

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