Brian Kyhos

Progression Photos by Brian Kyhos

 

 

Studio Tour with AIR Brian Kyhos

  

Pastels used in Bryan Kyhos' latest work                   AIR Brian Kyhos' studio at Maryland Hall

 

  

Ink and color from the artist's sketchbook                 Ink drawing in Brian Kyhos' sketchbook

 

  

Sketches by Artist-In-Residence Brian Kyhos           Window view of the artist's studio

 

An Interview with Brian Kyhos

What projects are you working on at the moment? Pastel drawing or paintings, depending on the way you look at them. They are also somewhat sculptural. I also do actual sculpture but I haven’t gotten into that in my studio here at Maryland Hall.

What are the primary materials that you use?  I’m working with pastel now but I also like oil painting. I have done all phases of bronze casting which was my first love. I love to work with modeling wax - it’s a very meditative process. I am mindful of the history of the material. I work with whatever materials I have at hand. I’ve been accused of being a pack-rat.

What’s your earliest memory of art? I’m not sure. I was always drawing with crayons. I was one of those kids that on my first day of kindergarten I drew a ship on the ocean and kids thought it really looked like one. I guess I have always had an innate ability.

How do you know when a work is finished? A lot of my thinking takes place in my sketchbooks. I will keep drawing and working until my brain gets so that I want to make something different. The beauty of sketchbooks is there are different ways to draw. Analytical is where you are trying to draw a figure and you want to record what you are seeing. Or, you draw out from yourself like a self-expression to get in touch with your inner side. I do both.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected? It has been mostly great. A few distractions but the atmosphere is very supportive. And, seeing the children come in for the dance classes is wonderful. I always love meeting artists and new people. I love the social connections.

When you work, do you love the process or the result? I like both. You know the writer Henry Miller? He would make these artworks and he would sneak down at night to see them because it gave him such joy to look at them. I occasionally give work to people and I call them my children. Sometimes I forget that I have given them out and I will see them at people’s houses. I say it is like visiting my children.

What is your ideal creative activity? I love creative writing and taking pictures. Taking a walk or making food can also be a creative undertaking.

Which artists do you most admire? I like the Wyeth family. Andrew, N.C., Jamie, and Peter Hurd. The Wyeth studio is open to the public in Brandywine Pennsylvania. N.C. always considered himself to be an illustrator but he elevated it to a fine art and I love it when people are able to do that. Then it becomes a spiritual thing. For me art and music are very spiritual.

Why are they your role models? The Wyeth’s, Michelangelo, Georgia O’Keefe, Edward Hopper, Winslow Homer… there work always resonates with me. I have done a lot of reading about artists and their lives. It is always interesting to see what life they lived. Salvador Dali was very playful - as was Picasso - and that is the attitude I try to have in my work as well.

Does anyone in your life regularly inspire you? My wife does. She is a good worker and is good to use as a sounding board. My kids are too. They are all very positive in their outlooks on life. 

Who is your muse and why? My wife is definitely a muse. She inspires me to not get stuck in places and keep moving. My dog ruby is a muse for sure. He is a Cavalier King Charles spaniel. He’s a show stopper.

What is your creative ambition? World Domination. No, My ambition as I am here is to create a new body of work, to have a show and have people enjoy it.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat? I like to drink tea and enjoy a glass or two of wine. I like to go on walks with my wife.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom? I feel pretty secure in who I am and what I like to do. Dialog as far as being influenced if people like my work or not - I am not concerned with that. I like the idea of storytelling. I like people to create their own ideas about my work.

I think a lot of artists get funny about making copies of things that they like. A lot of the great masters did just that and went to museums and copied art. That’s how you learn. I find it a very helpful habit. I like to write and I have done the same thing with writing. I started keeping a journal, mostly to remember happy times, and gradually overtime they would turn into a place where I would copy passages that I have read. It is important to do that. 

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