Dyslexia

The On Screen/In Person Independent Film Series continues on Thursday, November 8 at 7 pm with "Dislecksia: The Movie" and a discussion with the director, Harvey Hubbell. Tickets are $10; $7 for Maryland Hall members. (Click here to purchase tickets.)

Come early for a beer or glass of wine and to meet Harvey Hubbell. Patrons will receive free popcorn and one complimentary glass of wine per paid ticket beginning at 6:30 pm. Wine and beer will be available for purchase for the evening.

 
Maryland Hall has partnered with The Summit School to present a discussion with the director, Harvey Hubbell, and a panel of experts following the film to answer questions and share thoughts on the film and subject.
 

Sitting down to view the film I thought to myself, sure, I’m familiar with Dyslexia. That is when people see words backwards, right? Well, there is a lot more to this learning difference than what I thought I knew. I expected to sit down and spend 90 minutes learning facts from professional interviews and seeing stats across the screen. I thought I would return to my reality armed with these new facts a wiser person. Well I did, and much more.

Director Harvey Hubbell V brings us through not only his journey with Dyslexia but the journey of the disorder itself. The myths and truths are explored through Harvey’s contagious lightheartedness and positivity. Some of the most interesting perceptions are how many highly successful people live with Dyslexia and the ways they have learned to adapt. People like Stephen J. Cannell, Billy Bob Thornton and Emmy winning actress Sarah Joy Brown have made successful careers based on the need to read, yet share this learning difference.

I can only think how immeasurably frustrating it must be to feel like you can’t keep up with your friends in class. School can be hard enough. As I watched the intimate views of struggles & shortcuts, it made me wonder what resources were available and how involved are the school systems? Well, those questions seem to have become easier to answer thanks to the determination and passion of some. Educators and scientists have developed learning programs that have evolved through the years to benefit those with Dyslexia and without. One of the places that these practices focus on is instructing teachers & educators on how to recognize and teach a child that experiences hurdles in learning. The Haskins Laboratories of Yale University have been implementing this practice worldwide. It seems that many teachers never knew how to reach a student who enters their classroom before these practices were taught to them. Many teachers have given feedback on how teaching in these new ways has eased the stress on the relationship they have with the students. The best part, all of the kids in the class can learn reading and writing skills this same way so students don't feel segregated or that they have a difference at all. Technology has proved to be a friend for the dyslexic as well. Former Harvard Neuroscientist turned educator Dr. Gordon Sherman takes advantage of technology to facilitate computer programs in audio/video that allow the dyslexic brain to thrive. Students are able to learn in a way outside of words, outside of ways that cause them anxiety and inside environments that encourage confidence to grow.  

This film turned out to be one of my favorites that I viewed for this series. Harvey Hubbell V brings Dyslexia to light what many people don’t even know about it and the constant attention that it needs in order for schools to continue to receive funding for their programs and to keep these priceless educators inside their walls. Watching these stories brings hope not just to those dealing with Dyslexia, but to people who are affected by any learning challenge.

--Rebecca Daubney, Performing Arts Coordinator

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