Exhibit

Analogous is a series of site-specific works and photographic experiments that investigate the current state of photography. The works in this series make use of materials that have become increasingly obsolete in photographic practice, such as grey cards, instant film and obscure darkroom tools. By repurposing these objects, the project addresses photography’s past with reverence, while at the same time acknowledging its digital future. Also included in this project are two collaborative pieces with artist Todd Forsgren that delve into issues of art history education and the transition to digital archives in the arts.

I want to thank Maryland Hall and Sigrid Trumpy in particular for having the courage to put up shows they know are not going to sell work.  There are a plethora of private galleries in Annapolis that reinforce the cities’ reputation for having an un-evolved art scene.  What I have discovered in Annapolis is a small but sophisticated audience of people that crave more engaging art.  As an art center and not a private gallery, Maryland Hall has a duty to put up more challenging art exhibitions and thankfully they are rising to that challenge more and more of late.  I also think it is critical for artists in the community to fight the urge to make artwork that they think will sell in Annapolis.  It would be impossible to hold galleries in this town to higher standards if the artists themselves are feeding them derivative art.  Monet did a great job of being Monet all by himself.  And his art was cutting edge at the time he made it.  I think we owe it to ourselves, as a community, to foster the same type of cutting edge spirit for ourselves!

-Matthew Moore

 
Art history slides from AACC.
 
​Art History Slides repurposed for Matt's show Analogous.
 
Art History Slides that were saved by Matt Moore for his latest show.
 
Matt Moore in his studio at Maryland Hall.
 
Matt Working on 'Rose Window' for his show 'Analogous' at Maryland Hall.
 
Final Product of Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' in their show 'Analogous'​.
 
Light trickling thorugh Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' at Maryland Hall's Martino Gallery.
 
'Rose Window' giving the Martino Gallery a stained glass effect on the floor.
 
 
 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

A Connection in Clay artist Hank Murrow will host a gallery talk and slide presentation in the Chaney Gallery on Thursday, October 1 from 5:30–7 pm. 

About Hank Murrow


 

My three younger brothers and I endured a Jesuit education which was classical, vigorous, and abstract; so I was a sitting duck for the simultaneous encounter with Bob James and clay at the U. of Oregon in 1958. I was ripe for the idea of developing something from raw materials to an object transformed by the fire. At my first review, Bob turned over each piece to carefully regard the bottom before he looked at the rest of it; and I marveled, 'Hey, there's more to this than I thought!' ... which has continued to be true for 58 years.

David Stannard joined the faculty as I was beginning graduate work, and his gorgeous pots and profound understanding of materials perfectly balanced Bob's commitment to subject matter enfolded in rich metaphor. Together, they created an atmosphere of inquiry in the studio which encouraged us to share and learn from each other while remaining alert to our own calling. I was also very lucky to participate in six-week-long workshops with both Shoji Hamada and Michael Cardew; and to work alongside Jane Heald in our wonderful PotShop in Venice, California.

After earning a Master of Fine Arts degree in 1967, I went to Mexico to work for an art center in La Paz, Baja California. I married Bev Wickstrom in 1969 and took up a teaching post at Ohio University with George Kokis. During 1970-73 I was teaching at Anderson Ranch in Snowmass, Colorado with Brad Reed. Bev and I returned to Eugene in 1974, where she began working for the University; while I divided my time between developing kiln designs and work in my studio there.

Back in 1969 some students from my pottery class and I were visiting the art history prof at his home and studio, when I noticed a box on a side table. I asked what was in it and he said, 'You can open it......if you do it over the carpet'. Inside the beautiful box was a brocaded cloth bag, & inside the bag was a teabowl with a lumpy white & orange glaze. At first I thought it might be rough, but once I got it into my hands I was seduced by its comforting texture and light weight. The pits inside the bowl held tiny pockets of bright green from its use as a teabowl. I asked what it was and he said, 'Shino........four hundred years old.' Well, I put it back in the bag and the box, but never out of my mind, chasing it ever since! 

About the Exhibit

A Connection in Clay - In Pursuit of Craft is an invitational show of American potters displaying how skills are transferred through lessons taught from master to student.  This partnership in pursuit of craft has been ongoing from the time where firing of ceramics was the high technology, traveling through the industrial revolution and into today’s art and craft movements.  

We invited emerging artists and their mentor. Also current masters (who named their mentors and influences) together with artists they are influencing in the next generation of studio potters.  The show displays the story of this ongoing dialog between potters and their relationship in craft.

The current studio pottery in America movement owes a great deal to Bernard Leach (1887-1979), Shoji Hamada (1894-1978) and Soestsu Yanagi (1889-1961).  As Michael Webb in his book, Introduction to Bernard Leach, Hamada & Their Circle stated, “The meeting of Bernard Leach and Shoji Hamada in 1919 … started ripples which are still widening today and which may be considered one of the crucial events in twentieth century ceramic history.”  Leach, an Englishman, and Hamada, a like-minded Japanese potter friend, discovered pottery in Japan early in the twentieth century and devoted their lives to utilitarian pottery as an art form.  

Our show illustrates the diverse product from this connection in clay of Hamada and Leach and the interconnections of the potters in this exhibit. For example, Jeff Oestreich was encouraged by Warren MacKenzie to apprentice with Leach at St. Ives, which Jeff did starting 1968 and Jeff is one of the current pillars of the American mingei philosophy of utilitarian beauty today.  Another is Hank Murrow who in the sixties studied with Shoji Hamada for a shorter period of time; the Eastern influence is present in his work. 

Not everyone could have personally studied or apprenticed with Hamada or Leach, but the strength of the tradition, and the passing of knowledge and skills continues. We can see it in the connections between Chris Gustin and Seth Rainville, between Matthew Hyleck and Camilla Ascher and Missy Steele at Baltimore Clayworks (one of the important national centers for ceramics in the US), between Dale Huffman and Justin Rothshank and Missy Steele, between Matt Kelleher and Kenyon Hansen, and between Gail Kendall and Joseph Pintz. Many other connections take place; between Chris Gustin, one of the original founders of the Watershed Center in Maine, and Elizabeth Kendall the current president of the board of Watershed Center.  Even this exhibit can form connections in clay between you and the potters.

Maryland Hall recently added letterpress workshops to their curriculum and staff had the opportunity to spend the afternoon in the studio with the instructor, Bob Hardy. Bob showed us around the studio and gave us an in depth look into the world of letterpress. The afternoon was very interesting and informative. We highly recommend you sign up for the intro to letterpress workshop on Saturday, August 15 from 10 am - 2 pm. Click here for more information on the workshop and to sign up today!

Here are some photos from our afternoon in the letterpress studio. Don't forget to check out the Letterpress as Art & Function: American Primitive Letterpress at Maryland Hall exhibition on display in the Chaney Gallery through August 31.

 

The Maryland Society of Portrait Painters (which meet regularly at Maryland Hall) is sponsoring a bus trip to NYC on August 15 to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see the Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends Exhibit.

The bus will be departing Maryland Hall at 7:30 am and arriving at the MET around 11:30 am. The bus will leave the MET at 6:30 pm and will arrive at Maryland Hall around 10:30 pm.

For more details and to register for the trip, visit the MSPP website or click here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Capital recently featured the upcoming exhibition Nature/Nurture: The Paintings of Father and Daughter by Peter Egeli and Lisa Egeli. 

Like father like … daughter?

Peter Egeli, 80, is a well-regarded painter and portrait artist. A son of famed portraitist Bjorn Egeli, a native of Norway, he grew up in a family where every one of his siblings picked up the paintbrush en route to becoming acclaimed artists.

His son Stuart Egeli took another path. A 1992 Naval Academy graduate, he had a 24-year career in the Navy.

His daughter Lisa, 48, has now followed in his paint-spattered footsteps, becoming a third-generation member of the Egeli artistic legacy.

She, too, is a portrait and landscape artist. Her portraits hang in institutions and in public and private collections. Her portfolio includes meticulously detailed portraits of gorillas and chimpanzees painted in their natural settings.

On March 2 through April 11, the father-and-daughter duo are exhibiting their landscapes, maritime scenes and wildlife studies in the Chaney Gallery at Maryland Hall, 801 Chase St., Annapolis. Their showcase is called "Nature/ Nurture: The Paintings of Father and Daughter."

This is the first time they have exhibited together since family members staged a show in Baltimore in 1985.

In the showcase will be about 50 of their works both large and small. Primarily oil paintings, the Egelis are incorporating several pastel sketches and watercolor paintings into the display.

Some were painted while the pair were outside, standing either side-by-side or back-to-back. Several were created near the house of her father and mother Elizabeth Stuart "Stu" Egeli in the St. Mary's County town of Drayden.

Click here to read the full article to learn more about the father/daughter duo and their exhibit which will be on display in the Chaney Gallery from March 2 - April 11. 

Maryland Hall invites all 2D abstract artists to apply for the ALL ABSTRACT exhibition that will be on display from May 13 - July 11. Artworks limited only by your imagination. Explore color, movement, form and other intangibles that are not dependent on a recognizable subject.

Works up to 44” are eligible for this exhibit where one artwork will be displayed by each artist and can be a painting, drawing, print or collage. No sculpture or photography. Works on paper must be framed and ready for hanging. All works must have hanging wires. No saw tooth hangers will be allowed. Delivery of artworks is Monday, May 11 from 10-5. Works will be exhibited from May 13 – July 11 on Maryland Hall's 2nd floor hallway panels. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, May 14 from 5:30 - 7 pm. Please note, this is not a juried exhibit. 

Submit one image with the following information to strumpy@mdhallarts.org. Please include name, address, email, phone number, title of artwork, size, medium or technique, price or NFS.  The last day to apply is April 15. 

Image: Cassandra Kabler, Summer News, 2010, 31 x 22.5, watercolor. 

Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts (MHCA) will host the 10th Annual All That Art exhibition (from April 20-May 1) and auction fundraising event on May 1 from 6-9 pm in MHCA’s galleries.  Proceeds from All That Art benefit Maryland Hall’s visual arts program and the participating artists; live and silent auction sales are split equally between the artist and Maryland Hall. 

Since 2006, All That Art has raised more than $400,000 in support of artists and Maryland Hall.  The event has grown in size and scope and today attracts committed art buyers who are passionate about purchasing art and supporting Maryland Hall.  Thanks to artists submitting a variety of high-quality artwork and the work of auctioneer Brenda Anderson, who connects the audience to the artwork and artists, many pieces sell over retail value during the auctions. 

For All That Art 2015, artists will be juried into the event or invited.  Juried artists will come from an open selection process where all artists are invited to submit work to be considered by the All That Art jury.  A small group of artists will participate in All That Art by invitation.  

Work in all media are acceptable including but not limited to: drawing, painting, sculpture, jewelry, pottery, mixed media and photography.  Click here for more information and to submit your work. The deadline to submit your work is January 9.

Artist-in-Residence Patrice Drago has a couple of exhibits around Annapolis in October.

Stop by and check them out! 

Summer Haze, Acrylic on Canvas

 

"Above the Surface"

Patrice Drago's solo show of abstract sailboat and marine-themed art will be on display at 49 West
from October 3 - 31. There will be an opening reception on Sunday, October 5 from 5 - 7 pm. 

 

49 West Coffeehouse, Winebar & Gallery
49 West St
Annapolis, MD 21401
Website

 

 Brisk Afternoon

 

"Art of the Forest"

Patrice Drago will be part of a multi-artist, multi-media exhibit of art that reflects the poetry of trees at West Annapolis Artworks from October 2 - November 8. There will be an opening reception on Thursday, October 16 from 5 - 8 p.m.

West Annapolis Artworks
4 Annapolis Street
Annapolis, MD 21401
Website

 

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