Matt Moore

Analogous is a series of site-specific works and photographic experiments that investigate the current state of photography. The works in this series make use of materials that have become increasingly obsolete in photographic practice, such as grey cards, instant film and obscure darkroom tools. By repurposing these objects, the project addresses photography’s past with reverence, while at the same time acknowledging its digital future. Also included in this project are two collaborative pieces with artist Todd Forsgren that delve into issues of art history education and the transition to digital archives in the arts.

I want to thank Maryland Hall and Sigrid Trumpy in particular for having the courage to put up shows they know are not going to sell work.  There are a plethora of private galleries in Annapolis that reinforce the cities’ reputation for having an un-evolved art scene.  What I have discovered in Annapolis is a small but sophisticated audience of people that crave more engaging art.  As an art center and not a private gallery, Maryland Hall has a duty to put up more challenging art exhibitions and thankfully they are rising to that challenge more and more of late.  I also think it is critical for artists in the community to fight the urge to make artwork that they think will sell in Annapolis.  It would be impossible to hold galleries in this town to higher standards if the artists themselves are feeding them derivative art.  Monet did a great job of being Monet all by himself.  And his art was cutting edge at the time he made it.  I think we owe it to ourselves, as a community, to foster the same type of cutting edge spirit for ourselves!

-Matthew Moore

 
Art history slides from AACC.
 
​Art History Slides repurposed for Matt's show Analogous.
 
Art History Slides that were saved by Matt Moore for his latest show.
 
Matt Moore in his studio at Maryland Hall.
 
Matt Working on 'Rose Window' for his show 'Analogous' at Maryland Hall.
 
Final Product of Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' in their show 'Analogous'​.
 
Light trickling thorugh Matt Moore and Todd Forsgren's 'Rose Window' at Maryland Hall's Martino Gallery.
 
'Rose Window' giving the Martino Gallery a stained glass effect on the floor.
 
 
 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence Matt Moore takes you on a tour of her studio in Studio 312A.

Testing out work for his exhibition Analogous​ on display in the Martino Gallery now.

 

Photo slide panel for his exhibition Analogous​.

 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

What projects are you working on at the moment?

I’m working on my show that goes up in the Martino Gallery called Analogues which is a collaborative project with Todd Forsgren. Todd used to have a studio right across the hall and we were handed this idea about a dual show. It wasn’t something we pitched, it was just kind of there. We are taking old art history picture slides that we rescued from Anne Arundel Community College that were going to be thrown away. We are covering large acetate rolls with them to stick in the windows. We are hoping for good sunlight in the windows the night of the opening reception because they will look like large stained-glass windows. The slides will project light and shadows onto the floor to create a really cool image.

What are the primary materials that you use?  

I shoot on film still. I generally work on medium format, sometimes large format. For this show I am also using “found objects” and repurposing them into something new. That is a little bit different for me.

What’s your earliest memory of art?

In a way I feel like this question gives the impression that artists have some early childhood epiphany that they are going to become artists and I just don’t think that is true. Just because I liked art class in kindergarten, isn’t the reason I am an artist. Everyone liked art class. I know other people that had that early epiphany but for me it’s just not how I got here.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made?

There are no works that I wish I had made or didn’t make. I hate the sound of it because it sounds kind of… I don’t know. I certainly have a lot of ideas for projects, and with none of them do I think ‘I’m not going to end up doing that’. It’s either been done or will be done.

How do you know when a work is finished?

That is intuitive. I think that it is a real challenge for people. I usually have to try to force myself to push further. You get to a point with a work of art where you think its great and even your friends and artist-friends think it is great but generally in the back of your mind you know it could be better. It’s really hard to push further and take the risk of ruining what people think is really great. But, it’s really important to take that risk.

When you work, do you love the process or the result?

Both. I am going to admit that I do get a real thrill from the result. I like the process, I love the result. It’s just nice to see something finished and to realize you made that – it’s a boost for the ego and it helps you maintain your confidence. A lot of times when you are making something you are not sure where it is going. You start taping slides onto acetate for hours and your back hurts and you think ‘what if this stinks?. It is always nice to hear what other people think but its more of a personal thrill.

What is your ideal creative activity?

I really love working in the dark room at night. Sometimes I will go into the dark room, put on music and make prints for the sake of making prints. 

Which artists do you most admire?

Todd Forsgren. www.toddforsgren.com

Why are they your role models?

He isn’t really my role model. He is an artist that I admire. My grandfather was my role model. He taught me how to live.

Does anyone in your life regularly inspire you?

My wife. She is very supportive of me as an artist. Sometimes that means putting more energy into our home than I do. I’ve been married for a long while and there was a time when we first got married where I went to her and said ‘I’m going to quit this job and work on this project and we are going to be poor for a while, is that ok?’ and she was like ‘go for it’. That project helped launch my career. It did launch my career. So I basically owe it all to her.

Who is your muse and why?

I don’t know that I have a muse. I don’t think I’m that type of artist that gets obsessed with one thing.

What is your creative ambition?

I want to take a metals class. I want to learn to weld. It’s not because I want to make sculptures it’s more because I want to make functional objects. I want to learn how to make a coffee table.

What are the obstacles to this ambition?

Time. I’m very busy.

What are the vital steps to achieving this ambition?

The answer is you just have to do it. You have to prioritize it and once it’s a priority you will do it. There is time to do stuff; you just have to decide what’s important. Right now it’s important for me to make certain projects before I make coffee tables. It’ll happen. To be honest it is something I have been planning on doing this year.

How do you begin your day?

I’m a big coffee drinker so that has to be a part of the equation. And, I usually just let my kids crawl around and play in the living room before I go off to work.

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat?

I don’t really have habits. Coffee is a habit. My wife and I like to go out to breakfast once a week. We are big breakfast people. We like to travel in the summer. But, I don’t really have any obsessive compulsive habits that keep me centered or anything like that.

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?

Creative dialogue is absolutely essential. What’s the opposite of that, you know, right? Hiding in your basement? Creative dialogue has to happen and it has to happen all the time. I have a number of people I can count on for that dialogue. Some of them are fellow colleagues at Anne Arundel Community College and some are my friends or even some of the residents here. Also, engaging my students in dialogue on a daily basis is part of the reason I teach. My job is such a pleasure. Working with those young people learning photography and getting to see them expose their first print in the dark room, I get to see that moment every semester. I can’t have that moment anymore but I get to see them have it and it is really energizing for me.

 

For more information about Matt, visit his Artist-in-Residence profile

This is part of an ongoing monthly series featuring a Maryland Hall Artist-in-Residence (AIR). Check Maryland Hall's website every week for a new post. Each month we will feature a different AIR. Click here to visit the Maryland Hall AIR page.

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