Scott

Progression Photos

 

 

 

 

Studio Tour with Nathanael Scott

  

Wood burnishing and found objects by AIR                  Current series in the making by Nathanael Scott

   

Charcoal drawings in Scott's studio                                 View of Scott's studio at Maryland Hall

       

Artwork inspired by Scott's previous job at a wood flooring company. Wood tile samples and found objects pictured.

Interview with AIR Nathanael Scott

What projects are you working on at the moment? 
I’m working with wood and a lot of found objects. I use re-purposed samples from a wood-flooring store that I used to work for. I was not happy at this place of employment and that came up in a lot of the themes I work with. It hit me why I was there one day. It was something about the materials; it reminded me more of a graveyard. I used the wood slabs and was resurrecting them to a degree. The artist, Leonard Drew, he works with wood. He weathers the wood, burns, and scorches it. He lets it sit out in the sun, aging it and giving it character. I didn’t want to do carving or big sculptures so I was and am really inspired by him.

What are the primary materials that you use?  
Wood and found materials. I use chicken wire and different plastics. Even with my older work, it’s a process that comes naturally. There are themes that come up in my work; perspective and perception. I like to get my work to a perfect rough draft through trial and error. Then it will start to create itself. 

How do you know when a work is finished? 
To me, the work has multiple lives. The first life is when I am putting it together, here in my studio. When it is presented in a show or commission, that’s its second life-cycle. I am making my work to be open-ended. I like abstract art. It can be so many things. I like for my work to say a certain thing but not be too clear. I want people to have different opinions about it. 

When you work, do you love the process or the result?
The process. It is very physical. Art is always therapeutic for me. The process is very important and it allows the finished product to be different from the initial result I had in mind. Also, I like to take my time to make my work. 

What is your ideal creative activity? 
 I think of art itself as a conversation. Materials are like a language. I’m more comfortable speaking in certain languages - or materials. I’m always talking about the same things but sometimes I use a different language. Other creative activities for me…I like to listen to instrumental, classical, or jazz music. The bible. Books, either spiritual or astrological. 

How do you begin your day?

When I am in a good creative place I get up and pray. I might fast if I am working on something very important. Art is therapeutic and spiritual and if I go into it in that way I will accomplish more of what I want to accomplish. I like to block everything else out. 

Is a creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom?
It is very important to me. It was easier in college, but this interview is proof I can still talk your ear off about art. I have a friend who is a world-renowned artist. I like to go to his house and take some work there and we talk about different things. Art is always a conversation.

 

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