Art

Maryland Hall is partnering with BIG INK, for two sessions of large woodcut printing on August 4 & 5th. We are excited to announce the following 11 artists have been chosen to participate in this year’s BIG INK event.

Aug 4th

Jun Lee
Steven Munoz
Sherri Blase
Zachariah Schmitt
Delaney Green

Aug 5th

Louise Wallendorf
Christy Ball
Ariston Jacks
Mary Walker
Donovan Kramer
Anita Hagan

BIG INK brings together artists, community organizations, and the public to produce large scale black and white woodcuts for exhibition and educational purposes. Artists from the US and abroad submit a proposal to create a big print through their website. Print studios offer their facilities so artists may collaboratively print the work while museums and galleries mount exhibitions of the finished pieces. The project was initiated in 2012 by Lyell Castonguay and his partner Carand to share their acquired knowledge of working large.

 

At Maryland Hall, we’ll be utilizing BIG INK’s giant 48” x 96” mobile etching press to pull prints. Accepted artists will have two months prior to the event to carve their image into a piece of plywood. BIG INK remains in contact with each participant providing guidance and technical support when needed. Artwork made during workshops will be exhibited from Aug 6th - 19th at Maryland Hall.

We invite visitors to come and see the workshops being held on August 4th and 5th. The printing press will be stationed outside of the Eatery on our first floor, nestled in our Alcove galleries. There will be small sample wood-blocks that visitors can learn to use, and for just $2 take home their very own block print! Visitors will watch artists ink up their pre-carved wood blocks, handle paper, and learn how to use a professional printing press.

 

To find out more about BIG INK visit their website.

Gail Watkins, Color Canyon (2016)

Written by Janice F. Booth

Gail Hillow Watkins’s newest series of mixed media paintings, “Strata,” explores movement in simple, almost primitive terms.  The artist applies the technique she has been exploring for a decade,  layering and incising paint, paper, and various other material, but her focus now is on a narrative of motion, not a static uncovering, as in the 2013 series “Comics & Chromosomes.”  In some of these new works, simple forms leap and gyrate across the canvas bathed in color bands. The strata, seen together, become an undulating whole -- a dance troupe or a junkanoo parade.

With these new paintings, the viewer stands, a rapt observer, as the sands shift, light shimmers, and a curious sense of movement and motion begins. Since the lines of movement are contained in color bands, the dancing lines and the movement they suggest read like a choreographer’s notations.

Watkins’s kinetic forms evoke Henri Matisse’s work. Consider Matisse’s sinuous paintings, “Dance II,”  (1909-10) and  “The Dance” (1932-33).  In the earlier work, lines interconnect to create a sense of motion; colors, rich and deep, bathe the dancers in blue and coral. After twenty years of seeing and simplifying line and form, Matisse had eliminated all but the beauty of shapes against color to convey fluid motion.

 

Henri Matisse, Dance II  (1909-10) and  The Dance (1932-33)

Some of the works in “Strata” have a Caribbean flavor, perhaps inspired by Watkins’s travels in Cuba. Titles reflect Watkins’s Cuban memories -- “The Pink House,” “Malecon,” and “The Gate.” 

Inspiration for “The Pink House,” 2014, was the ubiquitous, tabby shell, stucco houses embedded with coquina shells seen everywhere in southern Florida and the Caribbean Islands. In this painting, bands of auburn, amaranth and cerise and carnelian reds, etched with shapes, bustle and tumble through and between the color bands, like figures in an apartment building, each with its own story and vitality. The colors and motion are playful rather than chaotic.

  

                                           Gail Watkins,  Malecon (2016)                            Gail Watkins,  Enlargement from Pink House (2014)

 

“Malecon,” 2016, seems a subtle rainbow of blues, pink, and bronze cascading down the canvas.  A lingering gaze rewards the viewer -- curving, arcing, reaching figures emerge from the bands of color, appearing as though from behind a curtain or from beneath the sea. In reality, the Malecon is an elegant esplanade in Havana with the sea’s tidal rhythms on one side, the ebb and flow of pedestrians and vehicles along the avenue.  The indigo and Turkish blue bands along the bottom of the painting suggest the Caribbean Sea, while along the top of the canvas striae incised into the blue band suggest Havana’s decorative grillwork against the blue sky.

Gail Watkins, The Gate (2016)

As we stand before the painting “The Gate,” 2016, we see a square of deep auburn banded with cornflower blue. The work is tranquil, a gate unused. “I saw a rusty gate at the entrance to a Havana Garden. It stuck with me – that lovely rust, the wild garden behind the gate, and always the sea and sky,”

Watkins revisits that sense of discovery from her “Chromosomes…” series with “Genome Fresco,” 2016.  But what is uncovered in this painting records not lost life-forms, but instead, some grand, civic event. Celebrants, dancers, participants all march and parade past the viewer, bearing up bands of vermillion and sapphire, rivers of color and ambiguous formations. The painting is playful and celebratory.

Gail Watkins, Genuine Fresco (2016)

Recently, Watkins’s works have eschewed the sensual pleasures of the Caribbean.  “Colour Canyon” and “Aleppo,” emerge from Watkins’s personal heritage and her response as an artist to the terrible war and suffering ongoing in the Middle East.  Watkins’s great-grandparents grew up in Aleppo, Syria, and left the city as newlyweds, settling in northern Lebanon.  The terrible images of death and ruin appearing nightly in newscasts and front pages across the world haunt us all, but evoke a particular pathos for Watkins. “Had they [her great-grandparents], as children, lived on those decimated streets? How did they feel as immigrants” What is my link to their past?” 

Movement, mystery, division come together in Watkins’s “Colour Canyon,” 2016, inspired by the artist’s trip to the Sinai Peninsula tracing part of her heritage. The muted golds, roses, and blues are separate forces, layered and resting one on another. Some of the bands reveal flowing, bulbous forms, some reveal very little. The unified painting suggests little motion, but a certain brooding potential.

Gail Watkins, Aleppo (2017)

“Aleppo,” 2017, is in stark contrast to most of the other pieces in this series. It is raw and still, dull gray and dusty tan, a band at the top the color of dried blood. And, on a ragged edge, a scrap of Persian blue, evoking a torn curtain or abandoned garment. Texture is central to this work; jagged, cracked, pockmarked.  There is no mistaking the visual impact – even without the work’s title.

Watkins’ work has, for the last decade, focused on uncovering what is hidden. Now, the work seems to step out into the light, conveying joy or suffering. There is no neutrality. What is revealed demands our attention.

AUTHOR BIO

Janice F. Booth is the author of Crofton: Images of America and has written for local, regional and national publications including What’s Up? Publications, American Artist, the Wildlife Art Journal, BizPeake Journal, and Lancaster Farming. Janice is an adjunct professor of English and Communications at Anne Arundel Community College, Arnold, Maryland, and has been an educator for over 40 years. She has a Master of Arts Degree from Wayne State University. Additionally. She can be contacted by email at janicebooth@verizon.net. Read her blog at www.open-line.org  

 

Music Together Chesapeake teachers

Christine Brimhall graduated from the Hartt School of Music (University of Hartford) with a Bachelors degree in both flute performance and music education. She continued her flute studies at Yale University, receiving her Master of Music in Flute Performance. Christine taught instrumental music in Prince George's County, Maryland for six years. As a music educator, she values the importance of early childhood music education and embraces family music making. Christine has participated in Music Together programs with her two daughters and started teaching Music Together in Fall 2011.  In July 2013 she completed a three-day refresher training, and earned her Music Together Certification I in July of 2014. 

Mandy Stinchcomb has a Bachelor's degree in Theatre from Goucher College in Baltimore. She began singing in choral groups over 17 years ago, and has had a love of music ever since. Mandy  has been participating in Music Together with her children since 2004, and has greatly enjoyed sharing music with her three children through the program. She completed her teacher training in the summer of 2008, and has been teaching family classes since the fall of that year.  Mandy has also taught Music Together In-school in Pasadena, MD. 

Art class Instructors

Holly Rosario was born in rural upstate New York, and spent her childhood exploring its forested terrain. Introverted and aesthetically curious by nature, Holly was interested in art from a young age. In 2007 she moved to Baltimore to attend the Maryland Institute College of Art where she pursued her Bachelors of Fine Arts in conjunction with a Master of Arts in Teaching. While at MICA, she developed an interest in watercolor, inks, paper cuts, and ceramics as well as a passion for art history.  As an artist, Rosario’s papercut works and watercolors are inspired by a love of nature on its most minuscule levels, and explore the role of pattern and repetition in the processes of growth and decay.  Rosario spent three years as an Elementary Art Teacher with Baltimore County Public Schools and is excited to continue her teaching at Maryland Hall.  She sees her pursuits as artist and educator as inseparably intertwined, and hopes to facilitate transformative learning by sharing her passion for the visual world.  She will be teaching visual arts classes for children.  

Thank you to the Severn Town Club for underwriting this event; and Annapolis Ice Cream Company.  

Main Stage
Annapolis Opera’s Faust set

First Floor
Academy Ballet School of Annapolis demonstration Room 101 2-4 pm 
Ballet Theater of Maryland demonstration Room 102
Letter Press Demonstration - Bob Hardy Room 110
Pottery Open Studio demonstration Room 112
Pottery ‘seconds sale’ Room 114 
Joe Dickey - Woodturning Demonstration Room 119 1:00-4:00pm 
Glass and ‘seconds sale’ Room 117A
Hands-on Activity for Children Room 117B
Etching-Sigrid Trumpy Room 117C
Maple Academy of Irish Dance Performance Gym: 2 -3 pm 
Raku Pottery Rear Parking Lot: 1-4 pm 
Grand Opening:  Lighthouse Catering Eatery 
ArtReach - Jovenes Artistas Art Show Hallway Gallery  

Second Floor
AYAP and Jovenes Artistas demonstrations Room 200
Voice Sample Classes - Alina Kozinska, Peabody Room 201:  3-4 pm
Face Painting Room 205
Annapolis Film Festival Room 212: 2 -4 pm
Andree Tullier – Figure Drawing for Teens Demo Room 213: 1-2:30pm
Ric Conn- Painting in Gouache Demo Room 214 1-3 pm
Don Cook Show and Gallery Talk Chaney Gallery
Maggie Sansone Chaney Gallery 1-2 pm
Opera, Theatre

Third Floor
Face Painting Room 300
Belly Dancing demonstration Room 301:  2:30-3:30 pm
Belly Dancing Mini-workshop with Carmen Nolte Room 301: 3:30-4:00pm
Popcorn Room 303
Eileen Razzetti dance classes Room 306
Peabody-Harp Recital Room 308 1-1:45 pm

In the Galleries
Don Cook Show and Gallery Talk Chaney Gallery 
AIR Exhibition Martino and Openshaw Galleries
ArtReach - Jovenes Artistas Art Show Hallway Gallery

 

Progression Photos - Stupa work in progress

     

 

       

 

      

 

Studio Tour with c.l.bigelow

  

Stupa trio in artist's studio                              Mixed media works

 

Mixed media nests made from found objects such as copper wire, conduit, knitting needles, barbed wire, etc.

 

 Views of the c.l.bigelow's studio at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts  

 

                                   

Interview with AIR c.l.bigelow

What projects are you working on at the moment? I am working on smaller pieces that are sculptural - using old hatpins, old beads, old bits of furniture. There are six or seven of them.

What are the primary materials that you use? Whatever comes to hand. My friend brought me a trunkful of electric conduit so I used it. I use car parts, nails, anything.

What’s your earliest memory of art? That’s easy. I was four years old. My mother used to buy leftover rolls of paper from the newspaper printer for me to play with. I remember I drew a giant penguin. It took me weeks to color it in. My mom was an artist so I grew up around it.

What work of art do you most wish you’d made? I don’t. If I had made it, it wouldn’t be the same.

How do you know when a work is finished? When I stop obsessing over it a 3 am. It might not be finished but it’s done.

How has your time as an AIR been? Was it how you expected?  It’s good.  I love being able to leave materials out and know that the dogs not going to get into it.  When I am done my work I can just shut the door. 

When you work, do you love the process or the result? Depends. Some stuff I just do to do, and other times it’s just a joy. I think that shows in the work. If I am slopping through something to finish, I realize, ‘I am done with this’ and find something else to work on. 

Which artists do you most admire? Susan Collis, Andy Goldsworthy, Vincent Van Gogh, Maya Lin, Christen Kobke. Kobke was a 19th c. Danish painter. Some of his work is as if there is just light on the canvas. These are not role models, I just love how they work. They all put only as much into the work that needs to be there. No bows no laces.

What is your creative ambition? To do the best work and then keep going.

What are the obstacles to this ambition? Me. My laziness. Self-doubts that creep in.

What are the vital steps to achieving this ambition? Pick yourself up and suck it up.  Everything else is an excuse.

How do you begin your day? Every other day I go swim. I have a cup of tea. Then I stare for a little - after I’ve let the dogs out. 

What are your habits? What patterns do you repeat? Good breakfast - oatmeal. I do paperwork until ten or so. Mid-afternoon I eat again then continue working. When the light fades that’s it, whether it’s in the studio or at home, I’m done.

Is creative dialog important to you and if so how do you find it and with whom? Yes. I find it with my husband, first and foremost. I run things by him. He can tell me, ‘that bothers me’. I value what he says. I also find it with friends here and my artist friends - we bounce ideas off each other. I have a found object group where we swap goods and help each other when we are stuck. We critique each other. The creative process is not just one person hidden away, it’s talking with one another.

Over the weekend, members of a street artists group called Urban Walls Brazil took over the first floor hallway at Maryland Hall. They transformed the blank hallways into beautiful works of art. If you haven't seen their work yet, we highly recommend you stop by Maryland Hall to check it out. Below are some before, during and after photos.

Click here to see more photos of the murals.

 

About Urban Walls Brazil

Urban Walls Brazil is the brainchild of art lover, Roberta Pardo. Born out of a traveling exhibition that made its way to Washington D.C., NYC, Annapolis and Sao Paulo, Urban Walls Brazil has grown into an ongoing Urban Art project that has unlimited potential.

Through murals and workshops, Urban Walls Brazil creates an exchange between cultures and opens the market between the United States and Brazil. Roberta houses the Brazilan artists through her residency program, where they are able to interact with local artists and work on community art projects.

Native of Brazil with dual citizenship, Roberta Pardo has lived in Maryland for the last 13 years, She spent most of her youth traveling the world and can speak 6 languages. Prior to focusing on art, Roberta was an international horse rider and trainer, competing for her native country and in numerous international competitions. Roberta’s background is in Industrial Design and Fine Arts. Her education includes FAAP (Fundacao Armando Alvez Penteado) in Sao Paulo, Brazil and Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California. Her great passion is Street Art for its connection between art and environment. 

Website: www.urbanwallsbrazil.com

Maryland Hall recently added letterpress workshops to their curriculum and staff had the opportunity to spend the afternoon in the studio with the instructor, Bob Hardy. Bob showed us around the studio and gave us an in depth look into the world of letterpress. The afternoon was very interesting and informative. We highly recommend you sign up for the intro to letterpress workshop on Saturday, August 15 from 10 am - 2 pm. Click here for more information on the workshop and to sign up today!

Here are some photos from our afternoon in the letterpress studio. Don't forget to check out the Letterpress as Art & Function: American Primitive Letterpress at Maryland Hall exhibition on display in the Chaney Gallery through August 31.

 

The Maryland Society of Portrait Painters (which meet regularly at Maryland Hall) is sponsoring a bus trip to NYC on August 15 to visit the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see the Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends Exhibit.

The bus will be departing Maryland Hall at 7:30 am and arriving at the MET around 11:30 am. The bus will leave the MET at 6:30 pm and will arrive at Maryland Hall around 10:30 pm.

For more details and to register for the trip, visit the MSPP website or click here

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Maryland arts community was stunned to learn that Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts was singled out as the only non-profit to have its funding deleted from the recently approved state capital budget.  This capital project funding was approved by the General Assembly – Republican and Democrats – to continue capability enhancements and renovations at Maryland Hall, including improvements to make the community arts center more accessible for those with disabilities.  This unprecedented action will harm the thousands of patrons, students, artists, volunteers, parents and supporters of Maryland Hall who benefit from this treasure in our community.  The Annapolis Symphony Orchestra, Ballet Theatre of Maryland, Annapolis Opera, Chesapeake Youth Symphony Orchestra and Annapolis Chorale are all partners in the ongoing project to update Maryland Hall, and will be impacted from any delay caused by this significant cut in state funding.  We urge that the money be restored so that Maryland Hall can continue to enrich the community and transform lives.  We appreciate the continued support of the elected officials and community members who value Maryland Hall and regard the funding of arts, communities and education as a priority.

                                    Theatre Patron Wing                                                           Theatre Production Wing – Act 2
 

The Campaign for Maryland Hall is a five-year $18 million capital campaign to modernize and expand Maryland Hall, the region’s premier arts center.  We have already completed an upgrade of the main theatre (Act 1) and have made substantial progress with public and private funding sources so that we might soon begin Act 2 which will include the first major construction at Maryland Hall since 1932. But we need everyone’s support!

Thank you to the many community members who have already invested in this important project to expand, add capabilities and modernize Maryland Hall.  Please encourage everyone in the community to provide financial support – large or small – to help Maryland Hall engage more people.  Nothing speaks louder than action.  Over 100 individuals and all of the Boards of 4 of the 5 resident companies have contributed to the Capital Campaign just this year – demonstrating support for the planned improvements for Maryland Hall to enhance important mission delivery.

To contribute to The Campaign for Maryland Hall, click here. For more information, call 410-263-5544 ext. 26 or email capitalcampaign@mdhallarts.org

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